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Old_Blood

Basics

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I want to start games programming and i have just started learning C++ basics (classes etc). I would like to know how much I should learn before I start 2D games? cheers

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you could likely create very basic games (pong and the like) right now. but you'll first need to learn a system such as directx, opengl, and the like, so that you can display graphics on the screen quickly. windows does come with such a system called gdl, but it is slow and not much use for games. i would get a book on learning the basics of directx or opengl, learn how your chosen liberty works for 2d, and than create a pong like game. welcome to the world of game programming!

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For 2D games, SDL is a great choice. But you should get a good grip of the basics first. Maybe make an ASCII tic tac toe or Snake before you move on.

shmoove

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I guess I wouldn't say you need to wait to learn anything specific. You just need to pick a project that's not impossible to do using your current skills and knowledge. Use what you know, and as you learn more apply it to your current project, or redo parts of the project, or apply it to some new project.

The range of 2D is quite broad, ranging from Tic-Tac-Toe and Battleship to Chip's Challenge to Warcraft III. At some point you need to learn graphics stuff (like DirectX, SDL, OpenGL), but you don't need any of that stuff to make simpler tiled graphics style 2D games. However, if you're using C++, that likely means Visual C++, or something similar, which requires learning a little about how to get basic control objects like buttons and such implemented. Get yourself one of those Sam's Teach Yourself books for that.

Also, understand that there is a lot more to a game than its 2D or 3D nature. Many aspects are common to all games of all types on all platforms. Things like the fundamental game loop (initialize, play, again, quit), file handling (maps, high scores, saved games, ...), AI for computer play, menus and preferences, integrating sound, etc.

You can learn a lot about these aspects by making a simple game like Yachtzee, and then applying what you learn there to something 2D like Chips Challenge.

Scott

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One more thought. If you attempt some game, try to finish it! Sounds dumb at first, but what I mean is "polished" finished. All the little details of looks and user operation. You're not going to sell this thing, but there's a lot of important coding in those details. It will be very important if you really want to make games that others want to use, as freeware, shareware, or commercial. And a truely polished game, whether it's Tic-Tac-Toe or Warcraft, is something to be proud lf.

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Quote:
Original post by Old_Blood
I want to start games programming and i have just started learning C++ basics (classes etc). I would like to know how much I should learn before I start 2D games?

cheers


You should probably learn the advanced stuff too first. The other posters here are correct, you could make something now [or shortly anyways]. I wouldn't though. The more tools you have in the toolbox, the easier it is to make something.

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Thanks for all your help.

I start a Software Engineering course in September. Has anyone been on a Software Engineering course? If so what has it given you that you havent gotten from a book?

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