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Gardon

So the question is... can SDL keep up with directx on a professional level?

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State your opinions/facts/whatever here. I'm very interested to see what goes on, mostly because I've had experience with both SDL and directx. Should I quit SDL and just work primarily on DirectX? It just seems so much longer and complex to get something running though... Gardon

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There is nothing preventing SDL from being used on a totaly professional project. Game companies may only use DirectX instead because it has been the industry standard for PC games since windows 98. But license-wise, and tech wise, there is nothing preventing it from being used professionaly.

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does that mean professionally as in SDL alone, or SDL with OpenGL. I mean, If I'm going to use SDL and OpenGL, it's almost like SDL and directx.

I'm talking about SDL alone, is it capable?

I don't want to have to mix it with another API.

Gardon

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Is it capable? Possibly. I'd tend to say no, however. Although it has some excellent functionality, it's developed on a small scale and not for profit. DirectX is developed on a large scale, and though it is distributed for free they make huge profit from various vendor licensing. (And besides, it's Microsoft...they can throw money at something all year to make it good.) You can witness the difference in the documentation, for example -- SDL's is small and incomplete, while that of DirectX is more what you'd expect of an API. SDL by itself doesn't do accelerated 3d, of course, you have to get the OpenGL addon for that. Then it's a case of, does SDL provide all the 3d functionality through OpenGL that DirectX does? Probably not, but I can't say as I haven't looked into that area of it. If you're going to do 3d programming, the most flexible way is to use the API directly, be it DirectX or OpenGL. So the question is, does SDL provide all the functionality that you need? Your best bet would be to familiarize yourself with SDL and then answer that question on a per-project basis. For small-to-mid sized projects, SDL would probably be fine, and as you say it's easier to use than DirectX. For larger projects, you may not want to sacrifice the control.

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Quote:
Original post by Gardon
Should I quit SDL and just work primarily on DirectX?
No.

SDl is an abstraction layer. DirectX is an interface technology. On Windows, SDL is implemented in terms of DirectX. Unless your sole intention is to build portable applications, there is merit in continuing to work with DirectX. Even OpenGL developers on Windows frequently use non-graphics DirectX components.

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Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
Quote:
Original post by Gardon
Should I quit SDL and just work primarily on DirectX?
No.

SDl is an abstraction layer. DirectX is an interface technology. On Windows, SDL is implemented in terms of DirectX. Unless your sole intention is to build portable applications, there is merit in continuing to work with DirectX. Even OpenGL developers on Windows frequently use non-graphics DirectX components.


Or you could use SDL for window initialization, and use DirectX for everything else. That way, you could use both.

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Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
Quote:
Original post by Gardon
Should I quit SDL and just work primarily on DirectX?
No.

SDl is an abstraction layer. DirectX is an interface technology. On Windows, SDL is implemented in terms of DirectX. Unless your sole intention is to build portable applications, there is merit in continuing to work with DirectX. Even OpenGL developers on Windows frequently use non-graphics DirectX components.
-edited-

Okay, in other words, SDL is rather thin and easy to learn. The documentation is, for the most part, very good. Further, what you learn in DirectX will likely help you with SDL and vice versa, so knowing both won't hurt.

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What about isometric 2d games? Would a combination of SDL and DirectX be better?

My problem is that I don't really want to learn OpenGL, when I have so many books on directx.

However, for the long run, should I learn DirectX and SDL, so that I can slip into 3d easier?

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Again with portability... when you're making a game, do you really worry about what operating system it will be played on? I mean, probably more than 90 percent of people that own computers own windows, so why not go with the majority? Is it worth the hassle to build it cross-platform, for the extra 10 percent?

Gardon

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