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TerraX

MS VC 2003.. difference between versions..

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Hi peepz, I need a new compiler, I'm looking at MS VC 2003 ... two versions... Professional £400/$800 (approx) or.. Academic £80/$160 (approx) What's the differences between the two other than cost? Does, for example, the Academic.. not optimize? (Like .NET standard didn't), and by optimize, does that mean that the compiler just ignores inlining? What does "optimizing" mean? I'm a one man "team" .. so I'm not fussed about not having "source safe" or whatever it's called in VC 2003 and I can do without the application wizards too. However, I'd like my inline functions to actually be inlined.. if that means I have to pay stoopid amounts of money, looks like I'd better start saving! Thanks in advance, Dave. EDIT: Also, if the compiler is optimizing, does that mean that it automatically creates err, "multiple code paths" for supporting various processor capabilities such as MMX, SSE etc, or do I still have to write inline assembler to take advantage of these processor features? [Edited by - TerraX on July 23, 2005 2:45:14 AM]

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I don't know for sure, but I'm guessing it's more stuff like extra features that are missing (source safe as you mentioned, and things like that). I can't imagine them using a less optimized compiler though, as that would more likely be more work. I'm pretty sure the compiler they use is free anyway, isnt it?

Matt Hughson

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i went through the same process as you not too long ago. with VS .net 2003 the difference between pro and academic is not great.

Academic IS pro (exactly the same, with optimizing compiler), but you also get student tools and a licensing restriction: You can't SELL your programs, but you CAN redistribute them.

i confirmed the licensing restriction with microsoft and decided to go with academic ;)

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Quote:
Also, if the compiler is optimizing, does that mean that it automatically creates err, "multiple code paths" for supporting various processor capabilities such as MMX, SSE etc, or do I still have to write inline assembler to take advantage of these processor features?


yeah it will take care of those sort of optimisations if you select them (they are optional) as well as various other optimisations.

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Quote:
Original post by BorisTSR
You can't SELL your programs, but you CAN redistribute them.
i confirmed the licensing restriction with microsoft and decided to go with academic ;)


Ahh crap... MS should give shareware people a break damnit (I'm thinking of creating my first shareware game within the next 2 years!)

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You can download the compiler from MS freely actually (you need to look through MSDN since they keep changing the links) They offer a free commandline version that you can use for any purpose. The also offer the VS Express freely. For them to work you need to do a few things yourself though: Download the platform sdk and install it. You need to manually fix the include, lib etc.. links yourself (this is not that hard), and do the same with the directx sdk.

There are some free IDE shells out there too like the Eclipse project. I am not too familiar with those but maybe it an be of some help?

Good luck.

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