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hylke2

Level

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Hello, What type of level would be best: * One big 3ds model * A big NURBS surface * Creating your own(takes a lot of time) If you're looking at performance, I gues creating your own would be the best. When it comes to saving time, using a lib3ds model is the best. But for the best quality of levels, it's probably the second option. But what's the best overall option for a game? And I've heard that rendering a NURBS surface takes a lotta time, does it really take so much time? And are there some other good options? Thanx in advance, Hylke

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I would certainly stay away from NURBS for terrain. In terms of detail terrain is relatively low on the list and it tends to be quite big so you want to stay away from really high poly maps or NURBS for it. Also, you should try and break your level up into smaller segments so that you don't have "one big mesh" unless it is a small map.

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He means by makeing, breaking it up into smaller mesh files. So a room with hallways will be one file, while the next room will be the next mesh file.

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yes,but you should keep all the meshes in one file. Basically you should divide the level geometry using some space partition algo, also for culling out the faces that you don't see. Try to search on google for bsp trees or octree or quadtree.

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yes, that is what I mean. You can use one big file, but make sure the whole terrain isn't a single mesh -- because then you have to deal with dynamically converting that into smaller pieces which is 1) a bad idea programatically, and 2) a hastle that you don't want to have to deal with. On the other hand, if each "piece" of the map is it's own mesh (within the one file) you can render only the subsets that you want. However, you will have to know where those subsets are which you might want to use a quad/oct-tree for.

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You're the first person to mention "nodes" in this post so far, so that probably means that you've done SOME kind of research on quad- or oct-trees.

First off, meshes. A mesh is your the surface that you're modeling. If you look up "mesh" in the dictionary, you'll see that it roughly means a surface with lots of holes in it - like the surface of a group of polys with nodes/vertexes and the lines.

Nodes are the corners of all your polygons. In quad- and oct-tree algorithms, they take on special meanings as a node on the tree. If you look at the picture of the quad- or oct-tree representation, it looks a lot like a tree, each intersection where a brach divides is called a "node". The importance of the quad- and oct-tree algorithms involves figuring out which nodes you need to display. You can think of a 'node' in this sense as being a group of one or more meshes or other nodes.

Before you go any further with this, I recommend taking a look at a data structures book. In programming, linked lists, stacks, queues, and every kind of tree (there are a lot) use nodes in them. If you really want to program effectively, you should have those down by heart.

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Quote:
Original post by hylke2
Ok, thanx.
But could in example, a 3D model of a person, be only one mesh?
Thanx Hylke

Of course. Up until Quake3, that's how they did it for the Quake games. In Quake3 there were three seperate models that composed the person: head, torso and bottom I think it was. Something like that.

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