Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
HAM

Understanding 3D Animation?

This topic is 4888 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Help me get something straight. I have three questions. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ #1 Before Vertex Shaders was most model animation accomplished by rotating and transforming multiple meshes to form a whole? Like if a character's arm bent at the elbow, there would be an obvious seem. The upper arm and forearm where seperate meshes and shared no vertex. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ #2 Is The only way to achieve 'vertex blending' (please give me the proper terminology if that is wrong), is either with Vertex Shaders or perform the caclulations on the CPU.? ------------------------------------------------------------------------ #3 This question is a bit more involved. If you have seperate meshes for a models peices you could have different meshes for the same peice. Example: Say if you had a character and depending on the shoes she was wearing you could have meshes for bare feet, shoes, and boots. And you could change the 'foot' mesh and still animate the foot. Can this still be done with vertex blending using Vertex Shaders? How can you change the mesh for a model part, and have the seems for connecting model parts remain 'seemless'? --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Any suggestions, links to articles, and help with terminology will be appreciated. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by HAM

#1 Before Vertex Shaders was most model animation accomplished by rotating
and transforming multiple meshes to form a whole?

Like if a character's arm bent at the elbow, there would be an obvious seem.
The upper arm and forearm where seperate meshes and shared no vertex.



Yes, segmented models.

Quote:


#2 Is The only way to achieve 'vertex blending' (please give me the proper terminology if that is wrong),
is either with Vertex Shaders or perform the caclulations on the CPU.?



Yes, but I do think that one version of DirectX supported vertex tweening in the fixed function pipeline - not sure if that can be used or not, but I think it supported 2 bones per vertex.

Quote:


#3 This question is a bit more involved.

If you have seperate meshes for a models peices you could have different
meshes for the same peice.

Example: Say if you had a character and depending on the shoes she was wearing
you could have meshes for bare feet, shoes, and boots. And you could change the 'foot' mesh and still animate the foot.



Yes, that's how it was done

Quote:


Can this still be done with vertex blending using Vertex Shaders?
How can you change the mesh for a model part, and have the seems for connecting model parts remain 'seemless'?



Yes, just because you have one skeleton hierarchy doesn't mean you have to draw the whole character in a single mesh. You can draw each part. The shirt can be a different model but you have to make sure the seams where it ends and the pants begin are perfectly lined up. This is how MMOs do their costumes and such.

I don't have any articles on it, but if you have two meshes weighted to the same skeleton, and you draw one after the other, they will be posed the same as the base skeleton. If one mesh is the characters limbs and the other mesh is his armour, then you can draw a different mesh for the armour if it changes.

- S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!