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dxFoo

What languages should application programmers know?

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Well, its not a very detailed question. But generally, you should be fine getting employment if you know C++, Java, and a .Net language. Once you know Java or .Net the other is fairly easy to pick up, and they both are very similar to C++ (although C++ will take a bit more time to learn thtan the other two, in my opinion).

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As many as humanly possible.

Depending on operating systems you plan to write for, just to work with old code, you'll need C, Objective C, C++, Java, Visual Basic (the old non .NET version), and probably at least familiarity with all of the .NET languages: C#, VB .NET, Managed C++, C++/CLI and J#. Depending on your definition of applications, you may want to add SQL to the list.

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Though not necessary, I'd add python and perl to the list of langauges that are good to know. You can save a fair bit of time making little apps (like tools) with them.

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A good programmer should be able to learn to understand code in a new language in a matter of minutes, to write useful code in that language in a matter of hours, and to be proficient in the language in a matter of days. Beyond that, it doesn't matter that much which languages you already know.

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Quote:
Original post by dxFoo
Subject says it all. Thanks!



ALL for ONE; ONE for ALL

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Quote:
Original post by Sneftel
A good programmer should be able to learn to understand code in a new language in a matter of minutes, to write useful code in that language in a matter of hours, and to be proficient in the language in a matter of days. Beyond that, it doesn't matter that much which languages you already know.

I'd agree with you, so long as the programmer already knows a language in the same "family" of languages. For instance, I haven't learned a functional language yet (and really should get to it). Even though I might be able to write something in it relatively quickly, I am guessing that the different thought process underlying the code will mean that I won't be proficient in just a few days.

I find that when people switch programming pardigms to try a new language they often try to use it like whatever they are used to. This usually leads to subpar performance and headaches, and eventually a groan of "Language X sucks, Y is so much better". Because I have heard this so much against almost every major language, I would say the "proficiency" timeline for a language that does things differently is more than a few days.

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