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When to move on?

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I've been learning C++, and I've been wondering. How much should you know about the language before you decide to go to the next more powerful one? How many programs should you have made?

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it's been generally recognized by experts in the field that at least 10 projects should be completed before a person try to learn a new programming language.

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Look, just keep practicing until you understand the language and you understand how to program...don't be in such a rush! Move on when you can honestly say to yourself that you're ready. :-)


Maledict

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Quote:
Original post by bobason456
it's been generally recognized by experts in the field that at least 10 projects should be completed before a person try to learn a new programming language.


That's silly. "generally recognized by experts"? I've never heard of it. What's your source?

Anyway to answer the question... Languages are tools. You should spend at least enough time learning a tool so that when the time comes, you will be able to use it with some success. How many programs is not important. What is important is the size and complexity of the code, and which features you have mastered.

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I am not sure why you would want to move on from c++.

if your asking should you learn another lanuage then the answer is yes when ever you want to.

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Without having cited any sources I'm not inclined to believe that 10 projects is anything more than a random guess on bibason456's part.

It has been said before by alot of people on these forums, and I'll say it again: Learning a language is not the most important, learning the programming paradigms and techniques is what's important.
Besides, it's not entirely correct to say that a language is more 'powerful' than another. Different languages have different strengths.

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I must ask, what do you mean with "more powerful one"? C++ is IMHO the most powerful language you can use, next to perhaps C and Java...

Regarding your question, do you feel you know the language and able to reach the goals you set up, wheter it be simple test programs or more advanced ones?

I don't think it's possible to say that you can do a certain number of programs before you can say you know a language, it differs from person to person...

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I don't think it's possible to say that you can do a certain number of programs before you can say you know a language, it differs from person to person...


and language to language. For me, I know that C++ has taken exceptionally longer to learn well than say, perl.

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Original post by Android_s
I must ask, what do you mean with "more powerful one"? C++ is IMHO the most powerful language you can use, next to perhaps C and Java...


That is silly. First of all, I would think java is less powerful (due to a higher level of abstraction and the fact that it runs quite bit slower due to the virtual machine). Also, there are likely hundreds of languages that can be considered more powerful, assuming you are basing it on how close to the actual hardware you are. Assembly, for instance, almost directly represents the individual registers and instructions. However, c++ is about as powerful as any 99.999999999% of developers would ever need.

Basically, it really depends of what you need. If you want some very basic functions that will lt you do 99% of what you need at a reasonable speed, then VB might be the best language. If you need more control and don't mind spendin a little more time setting it up, c++ is the way to go.

Anyways, I would stick with c++ until you are completely secure in programming and more advanced things. Make sure you understand Win32, classes, polymorphism, multiple inheritance, etc. Not all of it will be useful in every app, but it will devinately help once you start learning other languages. Other languages should be just a matter of learning the syntax and the various "unique" characteristsics and how to take advantage of them.

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I have been programming in VB for 3 years already and i have come to believe that C++ should have been my start off language. C++ is very powerful, efficient, and in some respects hard to learn. Because of this it's great to start with. The power and efficiency of it will show you that you don't "NEED" many other languages to accomplish the same task but languages like VB make it much easier to do smaller applications or applications with alot of GUI in them. Also i believe that the difficulty in learning C++ helps you to appreciate languages like VB. Since i started with VB i have met the harsh reality that i actually have to work to learn this language. If you get very familiar with C++ then when you move on to another (most likely higher-level) language you will pick it up easily and have all the proper problem solving thought processes.

With all that said i don't believe there is a set number of projects for which you can move on. In my personal opinion you should ask yourself whether you can make any program which you could want to make or whether it would not take too much difficulty to learn the necesary parts before moving on to another langauge. I believe that i can make any program that i think of in VB with either my current knowledge or a quick scan through google therefore i have just now moved onto C++.

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Can no one take a little joke, I was being rather sarcastic when I said 10. Sorry to cause confusion.

Anyway, It's time to move on to a new language when the one you are using can not solve the problem, or your finding it to limiting. Perhaps another language is slower and more restrictive but is quicker to get things up and running in, such as VB. Another reason why you might change is that your boss has just forked out mega $$$ on the new .NET and wants every one to use it or else the bosses boss will think money has been wasted.

My basic point is (in an ideal world) that languages are just tools used to solve problems. I think your in good stead learning C++.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by bobason456
Can no one take a little joke, I was being rather sarcastic when I said 10. Sorry to cause confusion.


Unfortunately, sarcasm doesn't translate well over the internet.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Android_s
I must ask, what do you mean with "more powerful one"? C++ is IMHO the most powerful language you can use, next to perhaps C and Java...
Which languages do you know. I bet I can guess which ones you don't.

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Quote:
Original post by bobason456
Can no one take a little joke, I was being rather sarcastic when I said 10. Sorry to cause confusion.


Since when did jokes not have a requirement of being funny?

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