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Book recommendations?

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Hello :D, I'm looking for some good C++ books. At the current time, I've got SAMS Teach Yourself C++ in 24 hours (it's an older edition, has just one paragraph mentioning the STL and uses <iostream.h>, but a good book none-the-less), and I've also got C++ Programming in Easy Steps by Mike McGrath - easy to understand and follow, but doesn't go into great depth and leaves certain things referenced in the code completely unexplained. What I'm basically looking for is an up to date, good, all-in-one combination of tutorials and reference of "normal" C++, including the STL and OO concepts such as Templates. I looked at Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days, but would it be too similar to the 24 Hour one? I'll also at some stage be looking for a book to teach me either OpenGL or DirectX (haven't decided yet, I'm not opening an X vs Y thread either). I'm very sorry, I know you've seen these questions all too many times, but I'm confused as to what to get. Amazon.co.uk has reasonable prices, I've got an equally reasonable amount of money kicking around. I'd be grateful for any recommendations you may have, sorry if you're sick of these n00bish questions. Thanks, I know I can always rely on Gamedevvers! ukdeveloper.

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It is almost always good to have a "reference" book in addition to a "teaching" book. You read the teaching book in order, learning more as you go. You use the reference book to look things up when the teaching book is either too slow, not deep enough, or just doesn't have the information you want right now ...

For reference I like "The C++ Langauge" by Bjarne Stroustroup. I also like "The C++ Standard Library" by Jositus (I think) as a great STL reference.

Their is also an addison wesley book specifically about teaching the Standard Tempate Library .. I think it has a name something like 'The Standard Template Library: Tutorial and Reference' or some such ...

for learning the early stuff (but with totally modern C++ techniques I think the "Accelerated C++" book might be good (but that's hearsay).

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I would also like recommendations for some books. I know the basics of C++ really well. I understand all of the loops, and I can program some simple apps. However, I'm completely clueless on pointers and the like. I don't really understand how to implement them or why they should be implemented.

What book should I read? I would like a book that's reasonably in-depth, and explains most things clearly. However, I definitely don't want a book that rambles on and on about one subject and is a complete bore. One thing that I'd like is that it gives a complete breakdown of the programs that you develop. What I'd love, but probably isn't out there, is a book that, from the beginning, I start developing just one program, and all the things I learn are implemented as the program gets more complex.

Thanks in advance.

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I don't know about everyone else, but books aren't that great, find someone who has the time to help you understand such things. Helped me a lot.

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Books are way better than finding tutorials on the web in general. At least books start from A and goes to Z. While following tutorials on the web You Start at C then goto A and pass by etc...

Of course it's better to have a teacher instead of a book, but not everyone has money for it or know someone, so they all usualy end up searching for tutorials on the web.

And i'm not saying web tutorials are bat either, i just mean it's longer and can be hard sometime.

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Personally, the best thing you can do is go to your local library and look at the books they have. The problem that I find with a lot of new books is that they are so badly written that they are hard to understand for a beginner. I think, people just write them and expect by putting a nice title to make a quick buck. Besides, programming books are not cheap. So, think twice before investing.

Also, although the books in the library might be outdated, I find that the old books are better at explaining than the new ones.

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Quote:
Original post by Darkneon
I think, people just write them and expect by putting a nice title to make a quick buck.


It helps to check who the publisher is.

Quote:
Original post by ukdeveloper
What I'm basically looking for is an up to date, good, all-in-one combination of tutorials and reference of "normal" C++, including the STL and OO concepts such as Templates.


Well, Stroustrup's "The C++ Programming Language" does have exercises at the end of each chapter, so does it count as a tutorial? If you're looking for something which works like a C++ course, check out Koenig & Moo's "Accelerated C++". Won't help much as a reference, though. If you are looking for an intermediate-level C++ book (i.e. you already know about the syntax, but are looking for more about how the language should actually be used), pick up Dewhurst's "C++ Common Knowledge: Essential Intermediate Programming" (it's a good, cheap book). For the standard library, Josuttis's "The C++ Standard Library, a tutorial and reference" is the book you need. If you feel really curious about templates, you'll want Josuttis & Vandevoorde's "C++ Templates - The complete guide". There are more books I can recommend (essentially, those I have on my shelves), but the first four books above are those you should probably get first.

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Quote:
Original post by gaminlegend38
What I'd love, but probably isn't out there, is a book that, from the beginning, I start developing just one program, and all the things I learn are implemented as the program gets more complex.


I'm currently reading through "C++ How to Program 4E" that I picked up a few years ago for a class. While browsing their website I noticed this other book which sounds like what you might want. I have no idea if it's any good but maybe worth looking into.

http://www.deitel.com/books/cppsimply1/

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Quote:
Original post by ukdeveloper
I'll also at some stage be looking for a book to teach me either OpenGL or DirectX (haven't decided yet, I'm not opening an X vs Y thread either).


If you decide to go the OpenGL route, Beginning OpenGL Game Programming by Dave Astle and Kevin Hawkins is an excellent place to start (also really cheap). It does assume a basic knowledge of C++ though.
After reading that, OpenGL Programming Guide by Mason Woo (also known as the Red Book) is very good. The NeHe tutorials are also a good place to look for tutorials .

As for C++ i'd agree with the books Fruny recommended.

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Quote:
Original post by gaminlegend38
What I'd love, but probably isn't out there, is a book that, from the beginning, I start developing just one program, and all the things I learn are implemented as the program gets more complex.


I posted this one in the sticky about tutorials. I'm currently using it and very happy with it: C++ A Dialog, Programming with the standard library, Steve Heller.

It does exactly what you ask for (complete program). It also features many lines of dialog between the author and a complete noob trying to learn c++, so I don't feel like I'm the only one who is having a hard time. And pointers are explained really well.
Anyway, it's also free online. (Sorry if this sounds like a dumb commercial. I have NO relations with Steve Heller! I'm just having a freaking good time learning this stuff.)

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Quote:
Original post by DeadXorAlive

I posted this one in the sticky about tutorials. I'm currently using it and very happy with it: C++ A Dialog, Programming with the standard library, Steve Heller.

It does exactly what you ask for (complete program). It also features many lines of dialog between the author and a complete noob trying to learn c++, so I don't feel like I'm the only one who is having a hard time. And pointers are explained really well.
Anyway, it's also free online. (Sorry if this sounds like a dumb commercial. I have NO relations with Steve Heller! I'm just having a freaking good time learning this stuff.)


Thanks for the tip. I can't wait to get started on it.

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