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bvs33

Source Code Management

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Hi, Myself and a friend of mine are playing around with some game programming stuff. We're basically still in the learning/goofing around stage but we're starting to put together a pretty cool little "tech demo" type of thing. Our problem is how to manage the project. Up until now we've been saving the source files and art on an FTP site I have set up, then we both download files from the site before we start working. However, we've had problems in the past with working on files at the same time and overwriting one anothers work, or forgetting to download the latest files... it's just a messy way of doing things. Does anyone have any tips for a better system?

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Use Sub Version (http://subversion.tigris.org/) - Its the best solution for source control IMHO.


-Nate S.

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Subversion is great. If you're using Windows, you can use the TortoiseSVN plug in that lets you do everything from windows explorer.

Edit: The VS.NET plugin is AnkhSVN, though I've never used it.

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Quote:

Original post by dimovich
Or you can use CVS (in case you don't like for some reason Subversion ).


I wouldn't go for CVS. I use CVS and have two annoyances, both of which are solved by subversion: in CVS directory renaming is not possible (unless you hack the repository itself) and renaming files destroys their history. If I wasn't as lazy as I am, I would have already switched. Just a few more directory/file renames and my annoyance vs. lazyness balance flips in favor of subversion :)

Tom

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subversion does look pretty cool.

The problem is that my server is a Red Hat 9.0 install and is pretty outdated. To upgrade all the apache packages I'd need get the web interface for subversion working... looks like a ton of work.

I guess this is a good excuse to finally upgrade to FC4.

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I'd have to recommend Perforce. It's a big high quality commercial package, however as they get all their money from site licenses from corporations, they make the entire package completely free for up to 2 users. I use this for my own projects, and I'd highly recommend it.

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If you look for something that is 'state of art', use subversion.

Perforce is a commercial alternative that has much similarities
to subversion in its principles, but comes with an easy to use GUI
client (and its free up to 2 users).

If you want to use something you can have without updating your server, you
probably will need to use CVS ...

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Quote:
Original post by Code-R
Quote:
Original post by Rob Loach
OpenSVN.csie.org offers free subversion hosting. TortoiseSVN is my SVN client of choice.
How secure is this site? who's running it? what tells me my source code won't be "peeked at"?
It's actually pretty good. You can disable annonymous view access, create secure user accounts for SVN authentication, etc... I generally don't worry about such things though because whoever actually succeeds on getting through the secure server wouldn't even know what they'd be looking at. I usually give all my source code out for free anyway. I'm a communist. It's a free service they're providing there, use it and give back to the open-source community.

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I'd have to recommend staying away from CVS. It's incapable of dealing with Unicode files (yes, some versions eg. WinCVS claim to support them, but it completely screws up the whole repository) and it's also terrible at dealing with large binary files eg. audio wavebanks or FMVs.

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I'd also recommend subversion over cvs. If you are using java as your development langage CVS is a very bad fit. If ever rename a class you have to rename the file its in and it will make you loose all history information in cvs :/

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Quote:
Original post by rollo
I'd also recommend subversion over cvs. If you are using java as your development langage CVS is a very bad fit. If ever rename a class you have to rename the file its in and it will make you loose all history information in cvs :/

Renaming files is hardly exclusive to Java. I'd say CVS is a poor fit for any kind of modern development.

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