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ade-the-heat

game development - with Renderware

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I know everything about software development. However, I wanted to know about the game development - the arts, the programming etc. To make it clearer what I'm asking for I'll tell you what I do know and you can fill in the rest: the artists use Maya/Lightwave/3DS etc to create and design the models - the characters, the buildings ,the streets and terrains etc These are imported into the game engine format. The programmers hack away at the code to make it do what the artists want it to do and to make it more efficient etc. Now my big question is - what role does Renderware perform in all this supposing it's being used ? It isn't an engine so what does it actually do and why can't the game designers simply use the game engine without using Renderware ? thanks

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IMHO renderware provides an abstracted graphics API, which enables the programmer to get one code running on different APIs (PS2/XBOX/PC/etc)....

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It's not a game engine? I'd say it is. It provides graphics, AI, audio, physics. If I remember right it has file IO wrappings and other things that shield the developers from the platform, allowing you to more efficiently write one codebase for multiple platforms.

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Renderware is an API that enables you to build a framework that will work on multiple platforms.

For example: you could build a game framework, and that framework would then work on PS2, PC, XBOX, GC etc.. with minimal effort....

Renderware can provide graphics, physics, sound and AI, all of which can be built into your framework and then used on multiple platforms.

its not too bad at what it does either...

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I've used RenderWare, or at least RenderWare Graphics. It's a nasty API, in my opinion. However, I can't knock it too much as it does what it says on the tin: abstracts the platforms for everything you could possibly imagine.

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