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Dead_Zone

hello im new

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hello, i just got into using C++ this morning lol i've been using DarkBasic Pro for a couple months and i just cant find any flexibility with it but i want to get into game development but wont try to until i learn C++ thoroughly then i plan to move onto Direct X but my question is i found these sets of tutorials and i wanted to know if i should continue using them im on lesson 8 right now entitled "Structures" what i do is take a brief moment to over view it then type it out and compile it til i get perfection without looking at the code again so i know i can do it. but is the "Learning to Program in C++" set of tutorils good to continue on?

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punctuation man, punctuation. haha.

Anyways, what site (or is that a name of a book?) are you using. When I first started to migrate from Java to C++ I read the book Beginning C++ Game Programming. It was pretty good. I then stopped for a while, but when I came back, I used cprogramming.com . I only used it to brush up, but the tutorials seems fairly well written.

There also is a sticky at the top of this forum with C++ tutorials.

In all honesty, I cannot answer your question fully, but I hope some of that might have helped.

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I wasn't going to respond to this thread, but then I noticed something...

The games market is diferent. Everything that is worth doing nowadays, is much more complex, and when I say much more, I really do mean much more.

For some of you reading this, while taking a break from implementing a HDR shader, it might not seem so true, but try to see it from the point of view of someone just starting out...

What I'm telling you is that, nowadays, making games alone, and trying to achieve something that you would consider mildly professional, is a much much harder task.

So the questions falls back onto you. Do you:
1) - want to make games for fun?
2) - or do you consider persuing a job in this industry?

If you chose 1, then perhaps it would be best to continue with Game-Making Tools, but if you want number 2, then proceed with C++, buy some introductory books, try to befriend people with programming knowledge, etc...

I hope I'm not scaring you or other beginners with my post, I'm just trying to be truthful. I love programming, and I love games-programming especially, I love the challenges, but some people might not...

Welcome to GameDev.Net, you've come to the right place to ask those Questions. [wink]

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If you want to learn C++ thoroughly, you'll eventually want to get decent books. Online tutorials are wildly unreliable. I mean, really, that tutorial you link to teaches you to use C strings instead of C++ strings? What language do they think they are teaching? Same, learning to write a linked list can wait: C++ already has a standard linked list class which they do not even mention.



* Heller - C++: A Dialog
* Koenig & Moo - Accelerated C++
* Dewhurst - C++ Common Knowledge

should get you started.

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Im not here to question anyone but as it stands im just learning C++, And i am broke right now or else i would buy some books the reason im broke is im working only one job which barely brings me money and im paying off my pre-ordered xbox 360. s if anyone can mention some good online tutorials then go ahead

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Original post by Dead_Zone
Im not here to question anyone but as it stands im just learning C++, And i am broke right now or else i would buy some books the reason im broke is im working only one job which barely brings me money and im paying off my pre-ordered xbox 360. s if anyone can mention some good online tutorials then go ahead


Being broke always sucks, but you might want to check out the closest library. Usually everything there will be outdated or nonexistent, but a few times I've found some decent programming books at local and school libraries.

And even if you can't get your hands on one now, saving up some money for a book is will be well worth it. If you look hard enough, you can even find some cheap ones. For example, C++ For Dummies may not be the best, but it's a pretty nice book, and you can probably get it for around $20.

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Original post by Dead_Zone
Im not here to question anyone but as it stands im just learning C++, And i am broke right now or else i would buy some books the reason im broke is im working only one job which barely brings me money and im paying off my pre-ordered xbox 360. s if anyone can mention some good online tutorials then go ahead


Well, that's kind of the problem. Like Fruny said, you can learn some C++ from websites, but they are highly unreliable, contradict themselfs, and sometimes even plain wrong.

The question allways falls on how do you want "to go at it"? If you want to do it with your head on your shoulders, you should curb your current excitement, start saving some money, and ask arround for what books we suggest. Be creative, look into second hand books, visit your local library, even try to see if they are freely available online.

The other thing you can do is comb the web in search of tutorials, download their crippled examples, find out that those examples where designed to be compiled on a version of Visual Studio you don't have or can't afford, get incredibly frustrated, and finally give up without never having accomplished much.

And please, unless your keyboard is horribly cripled, learn to punctuate your sentences. You don't want to pass as a 5-year-old, do you? [wink]

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Original post by Prozak
Well, that's kind of the problem. Like Fruny said, you can learn some C++ from websites, but they are highly unreliable, contradict themselfs, and sometimes even plain wrong.


Emphasis on the some. You did say you wanted to first learn C++ thoroughly, right?
Quite a few online tutorials are written by people who only have marginal or obsolete knowledge of the language. They'll mix C facilities in because they never learned to use the C++ ones, or will point you to outdated versions of some libraries (most commonly, using <iostream.h> when everyone knows the proper library header is iostream) and present fundamental facilities such as std::vector or std::string as "advanced" becaue they just don't understand them - and seem second-class citizens when compared to arrays and C strings because they are library components instead of being "built-ins".

Quote:
The other thing you can do is comb the web in search of tutorials, download their crippled examples, find out that those examples where designed to be compiled on a version of Visual Studio you don't have or can't afford, get incredibly frustrated, and finally give up without never having accomplished much.


You forgot the step where he has to figure out whether the examples actually are good style C++, when they even are legal.

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