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cvs at home

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hey guys, i currently dont use cvs at home, and it's getting anoying haveing to make regular backups of source code. im wondering who uses cvs at home, what they use. im looking for a solution that is simple to set up, easy to back up and doesnt use client/server architecture as i only wanna use it on 1 machine (but infuture maybe on multiple machines) cheers

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I'd advise against cvs, and in favor of svn (subversion). It's basically a better cvs.

Creating local repositories is dead simple.
Install TortoiseSVN, right-click on an empty directory in explorer, TortoiseSVN submenu, Create Repository here. Then you can just use that directory as your repository address.
If you later want to use it on other computers, you can install an SVN server and tell it to use that same repository.

This is what I use, though I have it on another computer with a server running so if anything happens to this laptop I'll still have my stuff over there.

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I use SVN and tortoiseSVN for client side. It is client server but you can run both parts on the same machine. Works great. Does everything I need it to.

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I have Perforce set up on my working machine, client and server, and it's been wokring out just fine for me to do things like that. It took me all of 1 hour to set up, and about another 3 hours to figure out how everything worked (for the most part) but after that, it's been smooth sailing.

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I use Subversion (wp) at home. As well as having ways of accessing the repository over HTTP and SSH, you can access it locally. While it does use a client-server model, when you run it locally you don't have to leave a server running or access it through localhost - it simply invokes another process that pipes the relevent data seamlessly.

It comes with all the important features of a version control system. Unlike CVS (don't use CVS - yuck) it versions the directory structure as well as the contents of files, so you can version things like moving, deleting, renaming, copying, adding files and directories, etc.

TortoiseSVN (as linked above) is really handy and is good for day-to-day use and can access just about every feature, and you've also got command line program which is handy for doing tricky things - especially for use in scripts.

Unlike most other major version control systems (including Preforce, and except CVS) it's totally free and open source (licence is nicer than GPL).

There is a free book on it that is very easy to read and also has great detail for when you need it. I highly recomend you check out the first couple of chapters.

I highly recomend using version control for your projects - it makes everything much eaiser. Subversion is probably your best choice.

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In fact, Subversion is such a good codebase, it has been extended into a distributed system (for larger projects, or those requiring different repositories) called SVK.

SVK has also been extended so it can:
* Mirror remote Subversion, Perforce, and CVS repositories to perform offline operations.
* Distributed branches.
* Lightweight checkout copy management (no CVS or .svn directories).
* Advanced MergeFeatures.
* Changeset signing and verification.
* MirrorVCP: VCP integration to support mirror/branch from alien version control systems like cvs or perforce transparently.

And has inherited features from svn:
* Versioned directories.
* Versioned renames.
* Atomic commits.
* Cheap branching and tagging.

More information can be found at SVKStatus, SVKAbout, and SVKBook.

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Quote:
Original post by crusadingknight
* Lightweight checkout copy management (no CVS or .svn directories).

Looking at the documentation, this seems like a giant step backwards. It's simply storing the same data (including an absolute path to the working copy) in the user's configuarion directory, which means that working copies can't be moved (particularly between machines) for starters.

The other features seem handy, so am I missing something, or is this really as short sighted as it seems?

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Quote:
Original post by Andrew Russell
Quote:
Original post by crusadingknight
* Lightweight checkout copy management (no CVS or .svn directories).

Looking at the documentation, this seems like a giant step backwards. It's simply storing the same data (including an absolute path to the working copy) in the user's configuarion directory, which means that working copies can't be moved (particularly between machines) for starters.

Why would that be an issue? If you're on a different computer, you should have a different working copy.

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Quote:
Original post by Arild Fines
Quote:
Original post by Andrew Russell
Quote:
Original post by crusadingknight
* Lightweight checkout copy management (no CVS or .svn directories).

Looking at the documentation, this seems like a giant step backwards. It's simply storing the same data (including an absolute path to the working copy) in the user's configuarion directory, which means that working copies can't be moved (particularly between machines) for starters.

Why would that be an issue? If you're on a different computer, you should have a different working copy.

Why is that? I find it's really handy to be able to move working copies around, between computers and such - laptops, USB drives, etc.

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okay, ive installed tortoiseSVN,

i made a repository, and added my project.

now ive made some changes, how do i commit the changes? how do i know which files ive changed?

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