Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
dxFoo

Help?

This topic is 4840 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I'm in college focusing on applications programming w/ game programming on the side. I want the ability to use my selected language on mobile phones, the web, servers, games, etc. Out of all I studied, it obviously seems like C++ shouldn't be the focus, but probably what I'm most comfortable on, C#, which can do a wide range than just specifically systems. Here's the issue though: I have a small spark in me that wants to fully go for game programming now w/ C++, but I don't know how realistic it is in getting such a job. I know it requires dedication, but the fear of less jobs is a huge matter to me; I'd end up here. It seems like getting a job in apps programming w/ C# seems more realistic than getting a game programming job. I could do games on the side and probably be just as happy. Although it seems like I know the answer already, I need to hear your thoughts. Thanks. Later thoughts: It seems like either you know you're going to get in, or knowing you won't. With these doubts of mine, I think I lack the dedication. To me, it just seems like there's less jobs in gaming, so why bother? I'd like to, to be honest. I'm just carefully thinking this through before I sail off into the unknown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I think most programmers with more than just a few years of experience would agree that it is not so much the programming language but the programming itself that defines your experience. So, even if you for now focus on one language that suits your current goals, this will be a huge advantage when studying the next language.

I take it that you have currently little outlook on a direct game programming employment. Therefore, I think it is best to famliarize yourself with a programming language and C# would not be a bad choice because of the broad range of applications. Then, you might get a job (note that usually not just programming is required) doing this. So far so good: you'll be programming for your bread which is a good start.

Then you could, in spare time, develop your game skills. In C# or perhaps you want to try C++ by then. Build this up gradually and make some demos to speak for you.

The main point is: first you got to eat and if you can pay for it by doing something as close to game programming as possible it is already great -- if you have the choice you might get a job that includes some graphics ase well for example. Build on your goals from there.

Greetz,

Illco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the helpful response. I think C# apps do come into play with graphics.. I think it's quite necessary because you'll eventually do something that requires it, like paint programs, 3d editors, car & house design apps, NASA apps, and so forth. At the same time of learning that (most likely managed directx), I'm learning what I need to know for games too. Since I have my own projects being documented, I'd rather make them than anything else. I think I will go for apps w/ gaming on the side then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
People who are smart enough to make a basic game such as pong/tetris, etcetera, should not have big difficulties to learn other languages. For a job in game industry would suit best to learn C++, but if you really don't like the syntax of it (as I do) for independant game devs you can learn any language you like best. In the end the world only looks at the results, did you make a good game or not . :) I'm starting to get interested in Mobile Phone game dev, and i'll see what language is used for that, and i'll adapt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's true. If I buy a book that talks about AI in C++, I can easily convert it to C# and learn it. It's easy to adapt to any language; it takes longer to expertise in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is somewhat related to the OT..
I realized something with MS: If I learn something, it's deprecated a year later. It's come up to the point that I can't keep up with Microsoft. Did you know that .NET is being replaced already? Did you know most of DirectX is being planned to be replaced? It's just.. what's the point of keeping up with them? I'm trying to get a job in programming, not a job in finding out what's the latest with MS every month. You go where they go. That's all. In C++, you go wherever you want in the world. You breathe it all around you, and how many products/tools has MS created since the creation of C++ which still goes strong to this day? I think this is a good idea anyway since I want to go into game programming. I'll let college be the study of MS products, but I'm quite done with it on my own studies. If MS is replacing tools every two years, is that really a good thing? Or do they know they're on the loosing side, thus having to compete in every possible direction? I'll stick with C++/Java, and find my way into gaming there too at the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!