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Fenryl

the best way of head modeling

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for a game? Box or poly by poly probably. Search 'how to box model a head' on google or 'poly by poly modeling'. It really depends on what program your using. Details?

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As slowpid said and if you're not a good artist, try to get some good digital photos of heads so you can 'trace' them in your modelling program. If possible get a straight-on view of the face and one from the side. If you get them the same size (through scaling in a paint program if needed) you should be able to use the two as backgrounds in the appropriate viewports and effectively trace over them as you model.

As for your actual question which was the best way, personally I'd start with a box and extrude/divide.

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I agree fully. If a face is what you want then go for it, its what I started with. For some great direction if you are having trouble with the 'artistic' side, visit cgtalk.com and feel free to ask quiestions. Very helpfull. Feel free to do the same here.

Good luck.

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Wel actual I meant with "I'm not a good artist" not good cg artist, I'm good at anime painting, I know the anatomy of humans (:-p) so I dont realy have problmes with that...

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In that case I'd suggest you draw the reference pictures yourself! It's so much easier to model from pictures than do it as you go, especially with things like people/animals where it's difficult to determine which bit is wrong and making a small change can make it look so much better. If you've got good reference drawings to go from your models will be much better, and if you can draw them yourself then that's great, you'll be able to get exactly what you want rather than whatever you can find on the internet. Just be sure to draw them perpendicular and without perspective, as your viewports will be like that, and make them the same size and make features line up (draw face front and side next to each other and draw feint lines across to make sure the features are exactly in line, this will help alot when you come to model it)

Hope this helps.

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If the face you're drawing is symmetrical it's much, much easier to only model one half. You'll need to create a "linked duplicate" (meaning any changes you make to the original affect the dupe as well) which you mirror along the symmetry plane and place next to the original so you can see what the whole head will look like. I'm not exactly sure how to create a "linked duplicate" in 3D Studio though.

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Quote:
Original post by captainmikey
If the face you're drawing is symmetrical it's much, much easier to only model one half. You'll need to create a "linked duplicate" (meaning any changes you make to the original affect the dupe as well) which you mirror along the symmetry plane and place next to the original so you can see what the whole head will look like. I'm not exactly sure how to create a "linked duplicate" in 3D Studio though.


To do this in Max you could select the original half and go to Tools -> Mirror... and make it an instance or a reference, I believe reference means the changes are only mirrored if you change the original, while instance it goes both ways, but I may be wrong.

And you may want to freeze the copy to avoid selecting it by mistake.

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Sorry if this doesn't apply to 3D Studio (I use Maya) but it should. First you want to start with 2 image planes, a side view and a front view, this are essential to getting the look right. Then create a cube with a subdivision width of 4, subdivision height to 4, and subdivision depth to 4. Now orient the cube as close to how the head looks as possible and delete one half. Then just go into side and front view and push and pull the vertices until you get what you want.

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