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Animus

decompile?

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Quote:
Original post by orcfan32
I'm talking about games like FarCry or Halflife 2.

Huh, really who did they sue?

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I have this pile of hamburger, see, but I really like cows, see, so how can I get the cow back from the hamburger? [grin]

Otherwise, I have to agree with Roboguy.

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Your best bet is to find some open-source games and figure out how they work. Proper decompiling is "beyond the scope of this document" no matter what document you're reading, and will give you a larger headache than if you had a piano fall on you.

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I'd say the games that worry more about reverse engineering are World of Warcraft and other MMORPG's because people can then see what the game client is sending to the server and thus create an emulator of a server and thus play for free. But yeah Snef is right, and people hide their illegal activities calling them learning all the time. Not to worry though, I'm sure Animus will lose interest soon enough

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Quote:
Original post by Sneftel
Quote:
Original post by orcfan32
I'm talking about games like FarCry or Halflife 2.

Huh, really who did they sue?


I'm not saying they did, but I'm sure they would.

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Quote:
Original post by orcfan32
"Decompiling" is also known as "Reverse-Engineering", which is an illegal process. If you want to decompile something, do it on something without a copyright or something that you made.


i allways love how some americans often assume that their laws applies to the rest of the world. reverse engeneering isn't illegal everywhere.

as to the original topic, decompilation is really an icky process, and the resulting code for most languages that isn't interpreted or JIT-compiled is usually almost as unreadable as the assembly. you also need to know what language the original program was written in, you need to know what compiler was used, and you need to know what version. you also might need to know the compiler-settings that was used (like optimization-flags etc). all in all, it's an icky process, and it doesn't really help you much when it comes to learning programming. programming is best learned by reading, reading, trying and failing.

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Quote:
Original post by orcfan32
Quote:
Original post by Sneftel
Quote:
Original post by orcfan32
I'm talking about games like FarCry or Halflife 2.

Huh, really who did they sue?


I'm not saying they did, but I'm sure they would.


If I'm not mistaken, Reverse Engineering is not in fact illegal. It is however, a violation of pretty much every EULA out there, and I'm sure they probably would sue you if they found out (which would require some miraculous stupidity on part of the person decompiling - you'd essentially have to publicly announce it). Not illegal though, I don't think criminal charges could be brought against you.

This of course wouldn't apply to everywhere.

OP:

If you want to look at the code of completed programs, you could try looking at some open-sourced games/programs/engines. This really isn't the best way to learn though.

You need to take those functions and syntax the books teach you and practice applying it to problems in order to design your own programs - this becomes easier with practice.

Start off with smaller programs that will be easier to figure out. Think about what the program needs to do, and then think about how you can get it done.
- What result do you want?
- What inputs will you need?
- What do you need to do to the inputted data to produce the desired output?
Break it down into small steps; flowcharts can be a good way to visualise all the steps to solving a problem. Once you've broken it down, figure out how to use those functions to create a program which follows through all the steps you require.

[Edited by - Kazgoroth on August 22, 2005 8:45:58 AM]

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Quote:
Original post by orcfan32
Quote:
Original post by Sneftel
Quote:
Original post by orcfan32
I'm talking about games like FarCry or Halflife 2.

Huh, really who did they sue?

I'm not saying they did, but I'm sure they would.

No, you still aren't getting it. They wouldn't, because they couldn't.

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Quote:

Stealing IP addresses is illegal and I will not be explaining how to do it here!


HAHAHAHAHA! I love her site! I saw it awhile back, from a link on a MINI forum, but I must have missed the post about it here... You've made my day!

[Sorry about getting off topic] If you would really like to see how other people are writing their games, download some of the source codes that are available. There are lots of games that have been released, such as Doom, Quake 1 & 2, etc. Honestly, they confuse the crap outta me though.

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