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WhatEver

Should I upgrade from VC++ 6.0?

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I've been using VC++ 6.0 for my OpenGL apps since before all that .NET stuff started coming out. I've been resisting upgrades because every once and a while I read a comment stating that 6.0 is still sufficient enough for my OpenGL programming. I want to upgrade; not because I want to migrate to .NET, but because I know that they've improved workflow and added new features to the latest compilers, and maybe fixed some bugs too by now. On top of all that, I'm starting to write programs for the Windows Mobile Pocket PC. So if my dreams can come true, the latest compiler can be used to write apps for both my PC and my PDA instead of using Visual C++ 6.0 and eMbedded C++ 4.0. So is it worth upgrading, or am ok to stay true to VC++ 6.0 and eMbedded C++ 4.0? If I do upgrade, which Microsoft compiler is the best? Thanks!

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If you can wait, which it certainly seems like you can, since VC++6 gets the job done for you well enough as it is, I would suggest waiting until early-mid November when I believe Visual Studio 2005 is coming out. You should be able to get VC++ Express for around $50. But considering you're not too interested in .NET, I believe (from what I hear, not experience) that VS 2003 (I think that's v7.1) has a good compiler too, but that it wouldn't be as wise to go with anything older (like v7.0). But I'd still recommend VS 2005, since you never know, you might actually wanna check out .NET in the next year or two, and VS 2005 supports .NET 2.0, which has quite a few nice things beyond what .NET 1.1 has.

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Quote:
Original post by WhatEver
So is it worth upgrading, or am ok to stay true to VC++ 6.0 and eMbedded C++ 4.0? If I do upgrade,


Yes it is recommended you upgrade due to the fact VC++ 6.0 has poor standard compliance and a not so good implementation of the C++ standard library. VC++ 6.0 came out while C++ was in the process of being ISO standardized, so its like 8-10 years old and is offically a defunct product now.

Quote:
Original post by WhatEver
which Microsoft compiler is the best?


VC++ 7.1 or above, VC++ 7.1 compiler is freely downable but comes with no IDE (you could use something like the Code::Blocks IDE with it). VC++ 8.0 express is free & comes with an IDE but its still in second beta although for standard C++ programs its pretty much stable.

[Edited by - snk_kid on August 23, 2005 2:38:07 PM]

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I moved from Visual Studio 6 to .NET 2003 about 5 months ago and I love it. I was very hesitant at first since I had already tried using .NET earlier and it had problems converting some of my old VS 6 programs. The problems were easy to fix (since I had to fix them again once I fully moved over to .NET), I just didn't want to take any time to fix them. Once I actually did it though it was only about 15 minutes of work to find what wasn't supported anymore, since the compiler picked up everything. I love .NET though. The environment is way better with tons of cool features which speed up the development process lots.

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Quote:
Original post by deadlydog
I moved from Visual Studio 6 to .NET 2003 about 5 months ago and I love it. I was very hesitant at first since I had already tried using .NET earlier and it had problems converting some of my old VS 6 programs. The problems were easy to fix (since I had to fix them again once I fully moved over to .NET), I just didn't want to take any time to fix them. Once I actually did it though it was only about 15 minutes of work to find what wasn't supported anymore, since the compiler picked up everything. I love .NET though. The environment is way better with tons of cool features which speed up the development process lots.


Just to point out to avoid confusion for the OP even though the newer VC++ compilers have .NET in the name doesn't mean you are forced to use .NET and managed C++ or C++/CLI, you can write standard C/C++ program aswell and its recommended to use VC++ 2k3 (7.1) or above as its like 98% standard C++ compliant.

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If you program plain C it's not a big problem to use 6.0 If you use the newer C++ features, however, I would really suggest upgrading because 6.0 does not measure up to the standard - especially when it comes to the STL.

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~edited (changed 5 to 2005)

~Agony: So I can compile my old C++ programs with Visual Studio 2005 with little hassle then? My main concern is with the OpenGL headers being compatible. If the old dsp or dsw files won't load, I don't mind recreating them with the new compiler. And as for .NET, I do want to learn how it works, and when to use it. But what confuses me the most about .NET is that I don't know how it relates to all the languages.

~snk_kid: I'll have to try out the 8.0 express. It'll give me an idea of what I might be seeing in Visual Studio 5.0.

~deadlydog: That's awesome. A couple errors is fine with me too. Besides, our programs will become more complient after fixing any errors with the new compilers. And I'm sure that by now most people have already made the move so new project files can be shared among programmers without woring if they have made the move to VC++ 7.1 yet.

Thank you guys. I will probably wait until Visual Studio 2005 comes out then, but I'll play around with 8.0 express until then.

[Edited by - WhatEver on August 23, 2005 2:08:15 PM]

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~edited (changed 5 to 2005)

[/quote]
Just to point out to avoid confusion for the OP even though the newer VC++ compilers have .NET in the name doesn't mean you are forced to use .NET and managed C++ or C++/CLI, you can write standard C/C++ program aswell and its recommended to use VC++ 2k3 (7.1) or above as its like 98% standard C++ compliant.[/quote]

That is exactly what I wanted to hear! That was one of my main reasons for holding back for so long. I want my old source files to work!!!

I can't wait for Visual Studio 2005 to come out now!!!

[Edited by - WhatEver on August 23, 2005 2:10:43 PM]

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It sounds like there is a bit of version confusion here... here are the products and their respective versions.

Visual Studio .NET - Version 7.0, sometimes referred to as "2002"
Visual Studio .NET 2003 - Version 7.1
Visual Studio .NET 2005 - Version 8.0, in beta

There is no Visual Studio .NET 5.0.

Also, as a previous poster stated just because .NET is in the name doesn't mean you have to use the managed runtimes. You can still compile plain ("native") C/C++ applications just fine.

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If I have MSCV 2003 Toolkit, and MSVC 6.0, what exactly would I have to do to mate one with the other, ie, have MSVC 6 use the binaries/includes/libs of the toolkit? Much obliged.

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