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forestlaw89

Whats the best way to study, code

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I have trouble studying code, and I would like to know what are you guys studying schedules for learning code. I wan't to know the amount of quiet you require to study hard, and if your in highschool how do you teach yourself code based around your schedules. I just have a hard time studying code because my main computer (for now) is located in the living room with my noisy family. But, if I tell them to SHUT UP AND LET ME STUDY (not much of a fight can be put up I am 16 years old and 6'4") they'll scatter. Please respond.

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I don' require quiet usually, and quite at home in noisy labs. As far as schedule, I just do it when I do it. Something comes up that I want to learn about to see if it is something I can use, I find a few articles/documentation on it, read them, and the implement it if I find it useful for my project. I'm sure everyone will tell you that to program well you must constantly educate yourself.

And just to be sure, by study code yo umean study programming, right? I generally don't find much use in reading other people's code. Instead, learning the languages and technologies and writing my own code usually works much better for me as far as a learning experience goes.

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I personally don't really require a quiet environment, but I've always been pretty good at ignoring distractions. It's quite common for 1 or 2 other people to be in the room with me on the other computers making noise, etc. and if they aren't I'll normally have some music playing. What sort of environment you need is a personal thing, but most people tend to need it to be at least reasonably quiet and free of distraction.

I'm not in highschool, but I learned a lot of what I know now when I was:
I worked through books doing all the excersises, usually putting an hour or more each day, but going out to do other things if some social activity or whatever was going on. I also had a block of at least 4 hours set aside on Sundays to ensure I did at least something each day.

Find appropriate programming books. If you can't afford to buy them, take a look at your local library or school library and see what they have available. If you don't understand something from a book or want to know about something that isn't covered, have a look for some online tutorials.

Read through the books, and do the little excersizes, but don't just type out the code, compile it and then leave it alone. Pick out something to change, and think about what will happen when you change it - then actually try it, and see if you're right. If you're wrong about what happens, then find out why the program does whatever it does.

Hope that helps. [smile]

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Use a notes database type program like TreePad to keep notes and code examples. Make sub-trees for each language and topic within that language. If you just put down the essentials and example code for each thing you want to learn you'll have a ready reference for when you're actually doing your coding.

I find this method is quick and easy so being distracted won't have as much of an effect. Also if you're switching between different languages it's handy to have a guide just to remember the syntax for each one.

Just remember, it's not necessary to learn all the commands by heart to program properly in a language. As long as you have easy access to the syntax and a good head for programming you can do pretty well for yourself.

Just keep your notes handy in a format that you can access them easily, and then if you're thinking "Now what's the syntax for a for loop in C++ again..." you can just switch over and in a couple of clicks have your answer.

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Headphones and some music will do wonders for you. I always like to have a little music going anyhow.

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If possible, move your computer somewhere quiet instead. I keep mine in a separate room where I can study. We all agreed that no one in my family goes in that room when I'm studying, study is important if you want to program well.

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Quote:
Original post by Ravyne
Headphones and some music will do wonders for you. I always like to have a little music going anyhow.


Yep headphones with music > quiet;

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As far as how to study programming i find it best to not study it at all. I picture studing as you sitting down with a book or some sort of literature reading it, taking notes, and attempting to memorize syntax. This shouldn't happen the best way to learn a language is to use it partially because you will remember syntax easier if you type it over and over in your code but mostly because programming is a much bigger task than actually writting the code. Don't study the code just use it and learn that way.

As far as the time issue goes, (im not a strong believer of traditional study techniques) i think that if you try to set a certain amount of time to "study" each day you can start to become frustrated while studing if you have something you'd rather do during that time like a social event or soemthing and once frustrated very little learning occurs so what i'd do is start a small project and set goals. Try to finish each (small) goal each day and if you complete it and want to do more go for it but it's easier to stick to reasonable goals that it is a time line. All the while if you do this once you are no longer studing and on to the part where you are just programming you will already have developed good planning and goal setting skills.

With all that said, everyone needs different envirnments for their work, i've found it easier to ignore the noise around me because i've programmed in many differnt locations and few of them quite and in even less of them i had the authority or power to make it quite. (for your family's sake i'd try to adjust)

-Lordoftools

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I agree to anything already said. I just want to add, if you have not at quiet place at home and you feel quite safe about the part of the language you've learned, go outside for a quiet place in the nature and programm on paper. Later you can come back and check if what you did actually is compile-able. That will prevent you from a try-and-error strategy in programming.

A quiet place and/or fresh air could be helpful, and you can get inspiration from your surrounding. Plus you won't get as pale as most coders get :)

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thank's for your help, fortunately I got my my dad to give me his dell (which is wierd because its a decent 2.8Ghz, 200GB hardrive, and 1GB ram) so I can program in my room and ignore everyone outside.

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