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BugSlayer

Building a level (a map)

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Untill now I have only been doing outdoor rendering. But I want to try to do some indoor rendering too. But I was wondering. If I make the level (i.e. a big house to walk around in) in a mesh maker like DeleD, doesn't it become just one big mesh? If it is, does any Space partitioning algorithms work on the level it self then? Like quad trees or oct-trees or anything? Is there anything to cull for the algo? Is it normal to make the level out of many small meshes instead to be able to cull them? Or what is the normal way to go about this. Thanks in advance. - BS - [Edited by - BugSlayer on August 30, 2005 2:35:40 AM]

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Hi there BugSlayer,
How are you doing?

The Problem
Building a big map and culling away unseen areas

The Solution
Definitely the right approach to go is to split up your map into sections... no need rendering the end of the stage if you are at the beginning and if the stage isn't just a small square room which you don't need culling for.

Take a look at this post
Geometry culling

I hope this helps buddy, take care.

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Thanks, I am fine, and you?

OK, thanks. I know about different culling methods. I have read up on quad trees before. Just never gotten around to actualy implement something liket that.

So hope I don't get the same problem as with Z-fighting then, if my map is devided up in small meshes.


Thanks
- BS -

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There's really not that much difference between outdoor and indoor meshes, when you get down to it. The draw distance on an outdoor mesh tends to be a bit larger and it's a little more continuous, but it's still just triangles and you could create it as one big mesh if you wanted to. People use techniques such as heightmaps or quadtrees only because certain things tend to be true for those meshes (such as a grid layout of vertices) allowing them to speed things up a bit, but it's easy to break it - throw in a couple of caves or some overhanging cliffs and watch those people break down in tears [grin]

Given the same view and projection transforms, you shouldn't run into any Z-fighting issues unless your mesh has been built that way; all you'll be doing is turning bits of geometry on and off, rather than moving them around. If they weren't z-fighting when they were a single mesh, and you've not moved anything, then there's no reason why they'll z-fight as seperate meshes.

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OK, thanks, and yes I am crying about overhangs..:) Thanks..:)

Thanks for you input on the topic. Will try to experiment a bit to find out how big they should be. I guess that if I was really good in algorithms and data structures I could try something like portals. But it seems like one step or two in front of me at the moment. A quad tree will probably break down my levels sufficient for now.

Thanks
- BS -

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