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2DExtremeOwner

What about the Scheme language?

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Yes I recommend learning it.

It is an algorithmic language.

It is dynamic.

It is deceptively simple on the surface and extremely rich underneath.

It is a completely different way of programming than what you are most likely to be used to.

There are many implementations.

The only downside to scheme is, while there is a standard, most scheme implementations do things somewhat differently. I suggest get PLT scheme and learn that first.

It is a timeless language, while other languages come and go, Scheme will always remain because it is based on a mathematical model of computing and not on the latest hardware trends.

It is not a very good language for system/real-time stuff (it could be ... ) mostly because there are no commercial Scheme machines available (but there are Scheme machines designed at MIT).

Go forth and learn Scheme my friend.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by hplus0603
Scheme is the language of the future.

It always has been, and always will be.


:-)


Then it is useless and might as well not exist, being of no use to those who exist in the present. [smile]

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Scheme is the language used in UC Berkeley's introductory computer science course - a course designed for people that might not have had previous programming experience. This is the book we used.

Personally, I loved Scheme. Having used C-like languages for some six year prior I found Scheme to be a breath of fresh air.

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The biggest downside of Scheme is that it isn't taken seriously. (Similar, in that respect, to Delphi, which is haunted by its Pascal roots.) It's mostly seen as a teaching language; the Big Boys use Common Lisp. It does have some respect as a scripting language, however.

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Original post by Name_Unknown
Yes I recommend learning it.

It is an algorithmic language.

It is dynamic.

It is deceptively simple on the surface and extremely rich underneath.

It is a completely different way of programming than what you are most likely to be used to.

There are many implementations.

The only downside to scheme is, while there is a standard, most scheme implementations do things somewhat differently. I suggest get PLT scheme and learn that first.

It is a timeless language, while other languages come and go, Scheme will always remain because it is based on a mathematical model of computing and not on the latest hardware trends.

It is not a very good language for system/real-time stuff (it could be ... ) mostly because there are no commercial Scheme machines available (but there are Scheme machines designed at MIT).

Go forth and learn Scheme my friend.





"while other languages come and go" ?????

Such as ???


And dont list a bunch of assembly languages or languages that were little more than someones Masters project.








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Original post by Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Name_Unknown
Yes I recommend learning it.

It is an algorithmic language.

It is dynamic.

It is deceptively simple on the surface and extremely rich underneath.

It is a completely different way of programming than what you are most likely to be used to.

There are many implementations.

The only downside to scheme is, while there is a standard, most scheme implementations do things somewhat differently. I suggest get PLT scheme and learn that first.

It is a timeless language, while other languages come and go, Scheme will always remain because it is based on a mathematical model of computing and not on the latest hardware trends.

It is not a very good language for system/real-time stuff (it could be ... ) mostly because there are no commercial Scheme machines available (but there are Scheme machines designed at MIT).

Go forth and learn Scheme my friend.





"while other languages come and go" ?????

Such as ???


And dont list a bunch of assembly languages or languages that were little more than someones Masters project.


Many language are eventually outdated (with the possible exception of languages that can be extended fairly easily, like Lisp dialects). See COBOL, PL/I, ALGOL, etc.

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ok scheme looks like a nice choice but look at my situation:

Im currently learning BYOND (to test ideas and learn more about what it takes to work on games in general,im getting a bit better on the coding of it as well.
And i have Beginning C++ Game Programming by Michael Dawson which is i nice read but i dont feel prepared to get into C++.

So basicly i hear that learning (simpler) languages help prepare for bigger languages like C++ so will Scheme help me on this?
How long would it take someone to learn the basics of scheme, alone and giving it atleast 2 hours a day for 6 days a week?
Same Q but for more advanced parts of scheme programming?


Thanx for any and all help that you give!

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Original post by Anonymous Poster
"while other languages come and go" ?????

Such as ???

Fortran, COBOL, RPG/AS400, C, Ada, Smalltalk...

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Original post by 2DExtremeOwner
So basicly i hear that learning (simpler) languages help prepare for bigger languages like C++ so will Scheme help me on this?

Scheme is not a simpler language. It is different. It does not give you full low level control. Instead it gives you high level abstractions you can use to build your software. Most of these abstractions do not exist in C++. If you learn Scheme you will feel suffocated every time you have to use C++ because it's missing high level abstractions you're used to.
Quote:
Original post by 2DExtremeOwner
How long would it take someone to learn the basics of scheme, alone and giving it atleast 2 hours a day for 6 days a week?

It shouldn't take *too* learn to learn the basics. Depending on your previous programming experience, your aptitude, and your dedication you should be able to write basic programs within a month or two.

It will probably take years for you to understand and fully appreciate advanced scheme concepts. You'll likely need to venture off to imperative land (C++, Java) and then come back to Scheme in order to fully understand all implications of its features.

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Original post by CoffeeMug
Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
"while other languages come and go" ?????

Such as ???

Fortran, COBOL, RPG/AS400, C, Ada, Smalltalk...


C is not gone!

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According to this:

1: Java
2: C
3: C++
4: Perl
5: PHP
6: Visual Basic
7: C#
8: Python
9: javascript
10: Delphi
11: SAS
12: COBOL
13: PL/SQL
14: Lisp
15: VB.net
16: Fortran
17: IDL
18: Ada
19: Pascal
20: ABAP

Number 2 hardly counts as dead (some of your other "dead" laguages are on here too)
Just because a language isn't "cutting edge" doesn't mean it is not still used and good to know.

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That list is idiotic. They rate languages based on the pool of skills and job requirements they find online. Clearly every other job description has C as one of its requirements because it's a good way to test basic programming knowledge. It does not mean actual projects are written in C.

The language is "dead" if barely any new projects are started using it. COBOL and Ada are certainly dead. Fortran will be dead when post World War II engineers finally retire. C isn't being used on any new user level applications any more. Even drivers and OS code is slowly being transitioned to C++. Really, let go of the past. It is over.

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Original post by TDragon
For those that can't be bothered to dig it up -- the Gnome base system is coded in C and C alone. :D

As is the entire linux kernel, as far as I know (well, ignoring GCC specific extensions)

Edit: See: The Wikipedia entry

John B

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Original post by Anonymous Poster
"while other languages come and go" ?????

Such as ???


And dont list a bunch of assembly languages or languages that were little more than someones Masters project.

Algol. Fortran. PL/I. Cobol. Rexx. Forth. APL. Simula. Logo. Shall I go on?

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Fortran isn't dead yet, though I often wish it was. A lot of heavy number crunching libraries and projects are still done in Fortran.

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How I know it. I wish I had a way to recover the many, many hours I've spent dealing with FORTRAN code written by a man who obviously felt that IN, OUT, and INOUT were to be used for artistic expression rather than accurate representation of arguments, and who was absolutely in love with FORTRAN's willingness to decide the type of a variable for you.

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Wow, I haven't thought about Scheme since I was back in college. In fact, I've tried very hard to forget about it! That class nearly made me cry.

I'm not a fan of that style of language at all. It's just not as intuitive IMO.

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Original post by SiCrane
Fortran isn't dead yet, though I often wish it was. A lot of heavy number crunching libraries and projects are still done in Fortran.


A college buddy of mine got a degree in atmospheric sciences and is now working for the national weather service. [Much to his dismay heh] he has to write a bunch of programs in Fortran. What is it, fortran70 or something? Back from the 70's? There's no good reason they use that language other than that's all the old timers there know how to use.

But I can't think of any commercial software made in fortran. That would just be silly!

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