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Ok, here is a big question for me, and i think it will help alot of other people in the same situation as me. I was wondering, im only a young teen, 15 a few weeks ago, and im wondering, how to get in to the gameing industry. I know im young, and i still need to learn alot. But for everyone who has made it, can you give us advice? What should we learn? What classes should we take in high school/collage? Should we be good in math class? Or Art? What school is best for what we want to do? Would it help if we were writing/creating/thinking/ or planing on making games? Here are some questions i had. What steps should i take to help me later on. I want to become a team leader,or a lead designer, becuase i like to make up designs for games. I like thinking up how you fight, all the genreal Gameplay. THe look and feel of the game. I wont do art design, tho i really like it. I want to be able to make MY OWN game. So i would need to be in a high posistion. Ill need years of expiriance, and practice. But i think this is the career i want to follow. Thanks in advanced for anyone who postes!

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Original post by Elthanor
I was wondering, im only a young teen, 15 a few weeks ago, and im wondering, how to get in to the gameing industry. I know im young, and i still need to learn alot. But for everyone who has made it, can you give us advice?

Assuming you want to be a professional game developer, you should treat it as any other professional field. If you are talking about a garage game developer, then you probably have all the skills you need since you will stop doing it in a few years.

First question you need to ask: Why have you singled out the game industry? Making games is much different than playing games. While playing games is fun and relaxing, game creation is stressful, high-intensity, long term work. Way too many people try to get in to the industry because they liked playing games, which is a pretty bad reason by itself.

You need to pick your career carefully since you'll be doing it for 30+ years of your life. The work day is longer than your school day, and you don't get a summer off each year. If you don't enjoy what you are doing, you're in for a miserable life.
Quote:
Here are some questions i had. What steps should i take ... alot ... gameing ... planing ... the genreal Gameplay. THe ... I wont do art design, tho i really .... Ill need years of expiriance, ... anyone who postes!

Regardless of your career choices, you should work on your spelling and grammar.
Quote:
What should we learn? What classes should we take in high school/collage? Should we be good in math class? Or Art? What school is best for what we want to do? Would it help if we were writing/creating/thinking/ or planing on making games?

Depends on what you want to do and why you singled out the game industry.
Quote:
I want to become a team leader,or a lead designer, becuase i like to make up designs for games. I like thinking up how you fight, all the genreal Gameplay. THe look and feel of the game. I wont do art design, tho i really like it.
I want to be able to make MY OWN game. So i would need to be in a high posistion. Ill need years of expiriance, and practice. But i think this is the career i want to follow.

You said "I wont do art design", so this probably doesn't apply to you. If you want to be an artist, you will all the art classes you can handle. You will need some math, but nothing spectacular. You will need to be comfortable with both traditional art and digital art. You need to draw a wide range of pictures, and realize that black and metal gray are not your only color choices. You need to develop a portfolio, and know why you picked those pieces for the portfolio. You also need talent.

If you want to be a programmer, you will need (at a minimum) math up through linear algebra and calculus. You will need programming courses up through and including a BS degree in computer science. Depending on the specialty you want, you will need to learn quite a bit more. AI will require computer theory and psychology. Physics will require, well, physics and math. Sound programming will require a solid understanding of music, music theory, along with lots of math and probably some EE training on audio and acoustic design. Graphics will require everything you have to give and will spit you out and replace you with the latest 22-year-old next-gen expert the day you don't devote every waking moment to it.

If you already make games by cutting out figures in foam or buying die-cast pieces, getting together with friends to make rules, maps, and environments, then playing games based on those rules, then might become a game designer. Eventually. There are no entry-level positions doing game design.

There is no chance you will be able to fulfill your dream of "I want to be able to make MY OWN game" unless you start your own company. Remember that Will Wright, the creator of The Sims, was well respected in the industry and by his company. It took years before he could convince management that The Sims was a good idea, and it was a skunkworks project that management didn't like. It was his threat to leave and start his own company that convinced management to give him a small budget and a small team.

So, getting back to what you CAN do:

Making games is an art. If you want to make computer games as a career, then make computer games now. Finish them. Keep everything you did in a portfolio. Finish up several games before you finish with your secondary education, and polish them up about a year before you go into industry. Make friends with people in the industry, since they can help you get a job. Make sure you know your math, since that's the one thing that nearly every game developer is always wanting to improve.

And most of all, enjoy yourself.

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Thank man! That should help me.

As you said, i know i need to work on my grammer, i was never good at that subject..

The reason I want to be in the gaming industry, i dont really know. Ever sence my friend and i started making a TCG, just becuase we liked laying them, and had the idea of making our own, iv liked creating games. I like creating Board games, games like D&D, Mage knights, Card games, things like that.

I was also thinking of becoming a developer for like hasbro, but i also like computers. I havent really done programing( i know some HTML) but i think ill be good at that.

Math... man i hate it. but ill work harder this year!

Thanks agin. Ill start making some games now.

What kind of games should i make?

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Original post by Elthanor
What kind of games should i make?


Well, the general advice given out is to start simple and plain. For this, you can experiment with a text based Tic-Tac-Toe game. Once you get all that down and working, you can then make it a graphical version using some graphics library (DX,OGL,SDL,Allegro,etc...). Ideally if you can easily port the game from console to graphical interface easily without having to rewrite a whole bunch of code, then you are on a great start in the process of making games.

After you do that, then you will want to try and make a simple Pong game using the same graphics library that you chose before. The idea of making pong is to understand the concepts of simple math and physics, collisions, and graphics. You will need to learn about user input, state tracking (Game Menu, In Game, and Game Over), as well as sound (optional, but you might as well start learning to use it).

The next step after that will be making a simple breakout game. Basically it is Pong but with a feature of adding just a tad bit more. I mean it still uses all the same concepts that you learned from Pong, collisions, input, sound, states, etc... That is why it is important to get down the basics of game design with these 'simple games' - you will just use the same concepts in other games, just in different degrees.

Rather than go on, with more examples, I'd say after you get all that done. Do it over again from scratch. Try to find ways to make the game use less code as well as be more efficient as well as have more features. If you are really up for a challenge, make your game so it is easy for the end user to change. That topic, data driven design, is something very useful in the game development process.

Quote:
I want to become a team leader,or a lead designer, becuase i like to make up designs for games.

That's a fine goal to have, but know that a leader is made, not born. If you want to be a leader of *anything*, there's a lot of other things that you will need to focus on that lie outside of the game development field. You should definitely perform lots of community service, sign up for student council, and stuff like that to be able to see what it is like to make decisions, talk to people, as well as handle a lot of situations.

As long as you have the desire, then you will just need to go to a college with a good Computer Science/Software Engineering program. Having a game development program is very nice, but those programs are just now starting to be added to colleges. By the time you go to college is a few years, you will have more options than generations before you have had. Something that you can look forward to [wink].

So yea, as frob has mentioned, work on that grammar, spelling, and professionalism. Work on math if you plan on doing game programming, which you should because no one likes doing other people's ideas, unless they are getting paid. Anyways, good luck and happy programming!

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Math is your friend, learn to love it if you want to be a programmer ;). I use math just about everyday when programming so you will use it a ton. Also when and if you start learning c++, start really small at first..

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If you want to program games, your number 1 friend is math (of all kinds). If you love math, you're half way there. Your number 2 friend is programming. The more experience you get at programming anything the better.

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I'm very intrested in programming and I think I'm quite well on my way, I have a compiler(:-p) and a good book about the basics of C++. But I'm very bad at math and I don't have much math in my course, instead we have very much "creative stuff".

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