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jeffakew

[java] Is there a free jave ide?

24 posts in this topic

Hello, I''m looking for a free jave ide (intergrated development enviroment- I think). Preferebaly I would like to be really small file download and require a powerful system. Its just that its such a hassle to run stuff from the comand line. Thanks alot.
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Borland''s JBuilder is pretty good. It''s not super fast but the overall IDE is pretty good. It has function/variable completion and other stuff like that.

I don''t think that it''s a small download though . 45M I think. I like my cable modem

Textpad also has the abiltiy to compile Java programs so it''s not really an IDE but its easier then typing stuff in the command line.



-------
Andrew
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If you are just starting w/ java you could try the evaluation version of CodeGuide, www.omnicore.com. It reports errors as you type them, making it a valuable tool for beginners.
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Emacs No, seriously, I think Code Crusader will be happy to handle .java files. I think it''s linux (or unix) only though, not sure...
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The open source Netbeans (based on Sun''s Forte for Java) is my favourite for its combination of features, speed and extensibility. beware of some builds they can be a bit dodgy so go for version 3.0 or 3.1 Beta.

www.netbeans.org. Use with CVS (www.cvshome.org) for version control. Fab!
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The open source Netbeans (based on Sun''s Forte for Java) is my favourite for its combination of features, speed and extensibility. beware of some builds they can be a bit dodgy so go for version 3.0 or 3.1 Beta.

www.netbeans.org. Use with CVS (www.cvshome.org) for version control. Fab!
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I would recommend staying away from the suckfests that are Forte and JBuilder. Memory hogs, and slower than all hell. I''m sure if you are using Java to do enterprise apps or something fancy, they''d come in handy. Overkill for simple games and just plain playing with Java. I''m happy with Notepad/Edit and a console window. or PICO under linux...


The reason those are so bad is the fact that they are made in Java. Sure, they can run on any platform that runs Java, but yuck. When you are on Windows, why not use a small, fast IDE? Well, I know of at least one way to do this.


RealJ


Quick, fast, Win32....I used it for a bit to do some Java, but never really got too deep in to it. But it''s nice!


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Notepad is all right. Hehe. Really, look for WinEdit, mail info@windowware.com

Thanks, Arthur(rockslave)
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I''ma big fan of UltraEdit when it comes to all kinds of plaintext editing.

www.ultraedit.com
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I find calling many of those IDE's is misleading... A lot of them are just glorified text editors. When I think "IDE" I think of integrated debugging, in addition to the other standard features. And of the ones listed, JBuilder, NetBeans, and Forte For Java are teh only ones with integrated debugging.

I've been using NetBeans since the post about it was made yesterday, and I find it faster than FFJ. It's also a much smaller download than JBuilder. The one thing I don't like about it is that it doesn't allow running search-and-replace on only the selected text, which I find VERY strange. Other than that, it's a great IDE.

Edit - CodeGuide might offer integrated debugging (I haven't checked), but I dislike using evaluation versions of software. However, it's worth looking into.

Edited by - c_wraith on December 15, 2000 5:02:08 PM
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Anyone try the new version of Forte? Any performance improvements? I liked it but I can''t stand the sound of my hard drive grinding endlessly.
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Hard drive crunch is because those Java IDE''s need 128 MB to run at a decent rate. All you need is a simple text editor with the ability to execute your compiler and such. WinEdit is configurable to do that, so it''s great. For DOS users you can even go old-school and use BOXER (Newbies say what?)
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I can''t see why anyone would recommend a text editor. Generally the people asking these questions aren''t master programmers. An IDE is easy to use, to setup and it helps you read your program by coloring syntax. Supposedly all these fancy text editors can do all that too, but I bet you have to set it up to do so, or something like that. It''s not free and it''s probably not the best but I use CodeWarrior, something edition. It costs $50 and does java, C, and C++. It saves a lot of time, is stable, ran fine on my old p200 w/ 32 RAM, and it doesn''t take that much skill to setup.
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Well, Codewarrior is a Win32 or Mac based app, not some Java bloated and slow overkill of an IDE, so it wouldn''t be that bad.
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I recommend the week-long learning curve (relative to me of course ) of learning e-macs (versions for Windows and most flavors of Unix). The JDE extension creates a pretty good IDE (sans code completion) even with a built-in debugger! This is the package that I''ll probably use for my Java development for a long time. If you dig syntax highlighting and all that this has it. And the thing that I love about emacs is the fact that you don''t have to reach for the arrow keys like you have to in all windows editors I have used.



joeG

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I''m a big fan of jEdit

It''s a text editor written in Java with a plugin architecture that makes it really extensible. People have written all kinds of great plugins, like a plugin that compiles Java files with a menu command/toolbar button/key combination. It also has syntax highlighting for lots of types of files. I could go on, but it''s probably easier to go look at the site (jedit.sourceforge.net if it didn''t do the link properly earlier).

Hope this helps some.
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Although not free,
I am in favor of Visual Cafe (www.webgain.com). It does hava a trial edition, but most importantly it can it all and is fast! Only set back is that it does not support Java 1.3, though.

Jacob Marner
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WinEdit has a built-in compiler and interpreter. It can also change the colors of reserved words so you can have a clearer view of your algorithm

Thanks, Arthur(rockslave)
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I am in the process of creating a free java IDE. It''s called JIDE. It will be a small download and completly free. I am trying to learn Java, I already know java-script, C++, Visual Basic, etc. It is writen in VB. It will work in Windows. It features Builtin web browser to view applets, a text editor, automatic compiling of code. Also i am going to try to add code lookup like VB when you press "." after a property. I will respond agian on this message board when i am ready to release it. Thx for any responses.

Minerjr
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quote:
Original post by minerjr

I am in the process of creating a free java IDE. It''s called JIDE. It will be a small download and completly free. I am trying to learn Java, I already know java-script, C++, Visual Basic, etc. It is writen in VB. It will work in Windows. It features Builtin web browser to view applets, a text editor, automatic compiling of code. Also i am going to try to add code lookup like VB when you press "." after a property. I will respond agian on this message board when i am ready to release it. Thx for any responses.

Minerjr


Need any help? I''m also trying to learn Java and I know a bit of VB. I might be able to help a little.
Mail me at:
wrenhal@juno.com



BeS
It''s Da BOMB Baby!!!
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Is there any other site other than borland''s ftp server from which I can download J Builder''s documentation. There server doesn''t seem to support resume after disconnection, and the connection always fails after downloading about 10 MBs from the file.
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I know this is late but ...

Try IBM''s Visual Age for Java (although it''s from IBM it is free)!

http://www.ibm.com/developer/java

As a general java resource, I like the IBM DeveloperWorks site.
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