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metal_kid43

calculus

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I just had a quick question for people. I'm in college now, working on my CS degree, and I was enrolled into a calculus class. I though I'd be ready for this class from previous high school classes, but obviously i was wrong. So I am going to take calc. just not at this time. I was wondering if calculus is actually used in the programming/computer science field. I know it is in game programming, but that's not my primary focus. I'd rather just get my general computer science degree and see where that takes me. Any/all feedback is welcomed! Thanks!

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I ended up needing a bit of calculus to do my job. But then again, I got involved in the field of statistics. That being said, there are a lot of problem domains that you may need to model as a general purpose programmer that calculus will be useful or necessary.

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Well, advanced computer science uses calculus. Usually you can study CS though without it.

Other than that, it really depends on what you're doing. General programming doesn't need calculus. For games, however, you're much more likely to encounter a need. Lots of graphics programming uses it, and of course physics is basically all calculus (though, in the case of game development, it's usually simplified -- for example, integrals are converted to finite sums, etc.)

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Don't wimp out. For anyone in any field of math or science, calculus is too important. If you don't learn calculus, you will be limiting yourself.

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Just to reiterate, you can easily get a BS/BA in CS without calculus. However, calculus will almost certainly be useful when you try to understand a given problem domain. If it touches on physics, chemistry, biology, graphics, economics, statistics, etc. Basically, if the words "rate of change" come in at any point, you'll be glad you had (or wish you had) calculus.

Then again, I'm the sort who thinks that a BA is usually better than a BS. A BS will give you a deeper understanding of your subject, but a BA will give you a broader base when it comes to actually applying what you know. The only classes that I feel were a waste were the ones where, for whatever reason, I didn't learn much (e.g. I just couldn't get into the prof's style, the prof sucked, etc.).

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I've never used calculus directly, but the principles are very useful. Besides, the trip is just as important as the destination (ie. what you learn along the way will be important for wherever you end up -- even if you never use it).

For the record, I HATED calculus! :)

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I have to say that calculus is a handy tool to have on your side. Right now I'm in Calculus II and taking my Data Structures class in college, and from what I gathered is that understanding O(N) "Big Oh" and Discrete Math is used alot more for Alogrithm Anaylsis then calculus.


That's my 0.02

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I dont know where you go to school, but calculus is a requirement to get the degree. In the University of California, to get a CS degree you need to take differential and integral calculus, multivariate calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. You also have to take some physics classes, which also require calculus.

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I dont know where you go to school, but calculus is a requirement to get the degree. In the University of California, to get a CS degree you need to take differential and integral calculus, multivariate calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. You also have to take some physics classes, which also require calculus.


No joke. My CS degree requires so much math that I would only need 5 more math classes to get a B.A. in Mathematics.

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Original post by ildave1
Quote:
I dont know where you go to school, but calculus is a requirement to get the degree. In the University of California, to get a CS degree you need to take differential and integral calculus, multivariate calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. You also have to take some physics classes, which also require calculus.


No joke. My CS degree requires so much math that I would only need 5 more math classes to get a B.A. in Mathematics.


how can you do B.A in Maths?

B.A means Bachelors in Arts, and mathematics is concerned with sciences.

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