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Which IDE?

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I have been using Dev-C++ for an IDE for almost a year now. I was wondering if I would be better off with something like Code Block or MSVC++?

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If you can afford it, I would definately switch to one of the recent MSVC IDEs, such as .NET 2003. You may want to wait until the MSVC .NET 2005 package comes out though.

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You know, you won't be better using another IDE. Of course a very good IDE is very usefull but you are the programmer, not the IDE ;)

Btw, I'm using MSVC since a lot of time and i like this IDE, only problem, cost $$$

So if you want to write a commercial game, you better buy the real one.

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And if you can't shell out the money (or get it free from school) then go for CodeBlocks.

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I used to use Borland C++ Builder and liked some of the features, but now I feel Visual Studio is somewhat better. Currently I use Visual Studio most of the time for C++ and C#, and the SciTE editor that comes with the Windows distrobution of Ruby for just about everything else (including Ruby, XML, javascript, XSL, SQL, INI files, and occasionally even C# and C++ - no need to open a big idea just to modify a single algorithm or type up an example for a gamedev post).

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Borland, you tend to have incessant compatibility problems for the rest of your life. CodeBlocks can compile with the VC Toolkit, or MinGW, or Borland for that matter, so you're usually set for life.

[Edited by - Promit on September 2, 2005 10:01:19 PM]

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Quote:
Original post by C plus noob
BloodShed all the way baby! in my opinion best and easiest to use IDE


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Yea I like Bloodshed's compiler too!! Until Microsoft's Visual C++ 2005 comes out this fall, I see no reason to switch to any other compiler. If you like the compiler you have right now, why change it?

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Oh yea, can you guys give me some positive feedback if I helped you. Some people in the forums have been really mean to me lately and lowered my rating big time. This is unfair! I'm an average guy being mistreated in the forums.

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Quote:
Original post by vrok137
Quote:
Original post by C plus noob
BloodShed all the way baby! in my opinion best and easiest to use IDE


-----------

Yea I like Bloodshed's compiler too!! Until Microsoft's Visual C++ 2005 comes out this fall, I see no reason to switch to any other compiler. If you like the compiler you have right now, why change it?

-----------

Oh yea, can you guys give me some positive feedback if I helped you. Some people in the forums have been really mean to me lately and lowered my rating big time. This is unfair! I'm an average guy being mistreated in the forums.


If I'm not mistaken, Dev-C++ just uses the MinGW compiler...

Right now I have switched top codeblock and the Microsoft compiler (from Visual studio 2003). It is very easy to set up. It doesn't have all the features of MSVS, but it has enough to write decent programs. The main feature I miss is intellisense. Does anyone know if there is a plugin somewhere?

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Eclipse with the CDT (C++) plugin works rather nicely. Lacking some of the fancy functionality that the Java environment provides but still quite a bit nicer than Visual Studio IMHO. And free, so it's always worth at least a try.

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Quote:
Original post by Sr_Guapo
The main feature I miss is intellisense. Does anyone know if there is a plugin somewhere?


Well, the plugin comes with CodeBlocks. Unfortunately, it barely works, and it's a surprise for me every single time it pops up.

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Ive been using Dev-C++ for many years now and I see no reason to switch.
Ive tried various MSVC versions along the way, but each time came back to Dev-C++ and mingw.

Actually, Im working on my own IDE/editor right now (not because I dont like Dev-C++, but rather because I need a number of features which AFAIK dont exist in any IDE yet, so Im building my own.) So far theres no syntax highlighting or anything, but it works well. The rest will be added as I get time.

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Once your project becomes big, turning on Intellisense means that you have to wait 3-6 seconds before you keep typing everytime you type a "." or a "->" or even a "(". Microsoft is great at adding features, but not so great at making them scale.

For small and medium size projects it's great, though (as long as it remembers to parse all your includes -- sometimes it mysteriously misses parts).

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Quote:
Original post by hplus0603
Once your project becomes big, turning on Intellisense means that you have to wait 3-6 seconds before you keep typing everytime you type a "." or a "->" or even a "(". Microsoft is great at adding features, but not so great at making them scale.

For small and medium size projects it's great, though (as long as it remembers to parse all your includes -- sometimes it mysteriously misses parts).

Of course, all this only applies if you're using C++. Intellisense in C# and VB.NET scales just fine.

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I haven't worked on so big project that i have to wait for Intellisense :)

And yes i did notice that sometime it miss some stuff... but it didn't happen much

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I've had a couple incidents where intellisense falls on its knees and proclaims all identifiers to be int _T; or some such thing. Haven't worked on anything so large that it slows down Intellisense...but I tend to modularize fairly aggressively.

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You may find yourself working in so many languages that one IDE isn't adequate and then you may give up and go back to VIM or Emacs and a command prompt. Everyone I've worked with does this apart from a few who use an IDE.

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Original post by flangazor
You may find yourself working in so many languages that one IDE isn't adequate and then you may give up and go back to VIM or Emacs and a command prompt.

Vim and Emacs are truly the emperor's new clothes of the programming world. Hell, they're not even that new.

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I like Bloodshed Dev-C++, but it does NOT play well with DirectX, I think it has some modules for OpenGL though. The inline assembler is kinda funky too. I would get MSVS .Net as soon as you can afford it, since most intro to graphics programming books seem to use MSVC++ exclusively. Once you get into college they practically throw compilers and software at you, so if you're in a college you might want to check what programs they have available for free download.

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Quote:
Original post by flangazor
You may find yourself working in so many languages that one IDE isn't adequate and then you may give up and go back to VIM or Emacs and a command prompt. Everyone I've worked with does this apart from a few who use an IDE.

You do realize that Developer Studio (the Visual Studio IDE) is fundamentally language agnostic? And that you can write plugins and extensions for any language if you have the time, inclination and skill, much like Emacs modes?

But I suppose that if you like that sort of thing, or think that using gdb is fun (DDD notwithstanding)... hey. Do your thing™.

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I can't live without Visual Studio .NET 2003. Now that my project is growing to a professional level its worth every cent.

It is rumored that the 2005 version will be much cheaper so you might want to wait for that. The beta versions are very good but has a limited license. Another option is to buy the cheap Visual C++ .NET 2003 Standard version (~100 dollar) and combine it with the free Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 compiler. This is the same compiler as the Professional edition, and the Standard edition gives you the IDE. You'll be limited to C++ but I assume that's no problem.

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