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Which IDE?

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Quote:
Original post by flangazor
You may find yourself working in so many languages that one IDE isn't adequate and then you may give up and go back to VIM or Emacs and a command prompt.

Vim and Emacs are truly the emperor's new clothes of the programming world. Hell, they're not even that new.

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I like Bloodshed Dev-C++, but it does NOT play well with DirectX, I think it has some modules for OpenGL though. The inline assembler is kinda funky too. I would get MSVS .Net as soon as you can afford it, since most intro to graphics programming books seem to use MSVC++ exclusively. Once you get into college they practically throw compilers and software at you, so if you're in a college you might want to check what programs they have available for free download.

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Quote:
Original post by flangazor
You may find yourself working in so many languages that one IDE isn't adequate and then you may give up and go back to VIM or Emacs and a command prompt. Everyone I've worked with does this apart from a few who use an IDE.

You do realize that Developer Studio (the Visual Studio IDE) is fundamentally language agnostic? And that you can write plugins and extensions for any language if you have the time, inclination and skill, much like Emacs modes?

But I suppose that if you like that sort of thing, or think that using gdb is fun (DDD notwithstanding)... hey. Do your thing™.

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I can't live without Visual Studio .NET 2003. Now that my project is growing to a professional level its worth every cent.

It is rumored that the 2005 version will be much cheaper so you might want to wait for that. The beta versions are very good but has a limited license. Another option is to buy the cheap Visual C++ .NET 2003 Standard version (~100 dollar) and combine it with the free Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 compiler. This is the same compiler as the Professional edition, and the Standard edition gives you the IDE. You'll be limited to C++ but I assume that's no problem.

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I really like Vim, but i can't combine it with VC++ .NET 2003, so i stoped using it. I think that Visual Stuidio is the best IDE, and i also think the same for OS.

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Quote:
Original post by Arild Fines
Quote:
Original post by flangazor
You may find yourself working in so many languages that one IDE isn't adequate and then you may give up and go back to VIM or Emacs and a command prompt.

Vim and Emacs are truly the emperor's new clothes of the programming world. Hell, they're not even that new.
I don't know how to respond to non-sequitors.
Quote:
Oluseyi said:
You do realize that Developer Studio (the Visual Studio IDE) is fundamentally language agnostic? And that you can write plugins and extensions for any language if you have the time, inclination and skill, much like Emacs modes?

But I suppose that if you like that sort of thing, or think that using gdb is fun (DDD notwithstanding)... hey. Do your thing™.
I realise that but I've only seen the extensions from ActiveState. It seems no one can be bothered to write even write syntax higihlighters for VS. In any event, the text editor in VS isn't very good when compared to something like TextPad, Vim, or quite a few of the editors out there (my pinky is trashed so I don't really feel like suggesting emacs anymore. Stupid keyboards with Caps Lock being where CTRL should be...).

Why did you even bother with the second comment?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by flangazor
Stupid keyboards with Caps Lock being where CTRL should be...


Umm... Where do you buy your keyboards? Cap lock should be on the left side between Tab and (left) Shift. Ctrl (control) should be on the lower left corner or lower right.

Since I use ctrl as my mic in most games I've more then adapted to it's location. What I really need is a new mouse with more then 3 buttons I guess.

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Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by flangazor
Stupid keyboards with Caps Lock being where CTRL should be...


Umm... Where do you buy your keyboards? Cap lock should be on the left side between Tab and (left) Shift. Ctrl (control) should be on the lower left corner or lower right.

Since I use ctrl as my mic in most games I've more then adapted to it's location. What I really need is a new mouse with more then 3 buttons I guess.
Back in the 80s, you could get keyboards with CTRL where Caps Lock is now. Sun and IBM made them for UNIX since CTRL is used often for command lines and in Emacs. It's significantly more comfortable to have CTRL next to the A key and no one uses the Caps Lock, so wtf? Pic.

Now CTRL is way off on the bottom corner and stuff like Emacs and UNIX shells using CTRL make you contort your hand off the homerow and it blows.

Let's not derail the thread anymore. I just wanted to chime in that not all professional developers use IDEs and thought it might interest the OP.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Visual C++ 2005 is in beta 2 and it's free. It supports C89, C99, Standard C++ and C++.NET. You can continue in Win32 (unmanaged) or CLR (managed) applications. It's probably one of the greatest IDE's for serious C++ developers.

http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/express/visualc/default.aspx

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