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Pixel Bob

A Welcome To Myself

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I thought i would post a hello thread just to make everyone aware of my exsistence on the forum, in between the multitude of other threads that will more than likely appear during the course of today, My name's Scott, i'm 18 and am currently living in Scotland. My programming experience is a little narrow justnow, being mainly Comal87 through school and i'm just looking into BASIC4GL which is similar in structure to Comal87 but interfaces with OpenGL so i am able to make some small games. I do have a copy of Microsoft Visual C++.NET 2003 but up until now, want to make small steps in languages. As you've probably heard a million times before, the games industry is my goal, but having problems with maths is a wall in the path to victory at the moment, and something i hope to eradicate soon enough. I'll be looking more into OpenGL justnow, but i'm getting a little frusttrated as to where to go after that, obviously to C++, but i would like to find as excellent resources on C++ programming and OO programming in the language as possible. Also, do you think i'm a little old to start programming seriously? I've always felt i have been.

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Quote:
Original post by evolutional
You're never too old ;)


Well now that i think about it, possibly not, i'm not scared of C++, it just seems a little over my head at the moment and well, it seems a little embarrasing as such, not being able to code like the "pr0"'s but of course, they obviously started the way i started. =) I'm going to be studying a 2 year course with Oxford University for a Diploma in Computing in January so i have that to look forward too i suppose.

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Mhe.. 18 is nothing :P And C++ aint that hard if you get a good book. Accelerated C++ is a good book apparently, buy that one :)

Cheers!

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Welcome to the forums! [smile]

18 is still plenty young enough. I'd suggest perhaps investing in a good book, such as 'Accelerated C++' if you want to learn some C++. Since you mentioned OpenGL, I'll also point at the NeHe tutorials, which are a great place to get started with OpenGL.

P.S. Check your PMs at some point. [wink]

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Too old?? No! I would of started then too, but since I heard of C++ I decided to try it and thats why I started since I was eleven(now 13 and registered). And welcome!

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it doesn't matter how old you are as long as you are willing to learn and invest the appropriate time. Don't rush it. And 18 is young :P

Get a good book and do every exercise you can. Eventually it all comes together and makes sense. The more exercises you do in a particular area of the language the better you get at it and the more ways you see you can implement it in your own projects.

Goodluck and welcome to the forum! :)

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I'm another 18-year old Scotsman.

I've been programming on and off in VB for a few years, but seriously got into C++ in about November last year, and I've kept going since.

I was 17 1/2 back then, and I didn't think it was too late to start.

Good luck!

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I uninstalled my Microsoft Visual C++ program today incidentally seeing as i couldn't find the small "Getting Started" guide book that was included in the package as well as some SDP posters, yes it seems Microsoft even supply posters.

I was hoping that the small guide may have been available online as an E-Book but it seems not as i searched high and low on the Microsoft Tech section of their website and i'm always wary of online guides.

Now, do i install the program and start afresh, or not?

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God no, you're not too old. When I was 18, my programming experience was as follows BASIC, Visual BASIC, and Comal87 (they're still teaching that in schools? Good god). I started learning C++ when I was 18, when I went to university.

I still have some problems with maths, I still don't know calculus, but I have learned a lot of the maths required for 3D programming. I've found it a lot easier to learn maths, when I have some kind of context for it, such as game programming. If you keep trying and trying with the maths, then eventually it will stick. The first time I was introduced to matrix transformations, I had absolutely no idea what was going on.

If you're going to be doing a computing course at College or University, then that will help. I found that going to university brought my programming on in leaps and bounds. In the first year, they assumed you didn't know any programming, so learning programming at 18 isn't that unusual. Christ, one of the guys on my course was 28 when we started uni.

My advice to you, something I wish I had done at your age, is to buy a lot of game programming books, and start learning now, rather than later. I wish I'd started game programming a lot sooner.

I'm 25 now, and I think I'm well on the way to getting a coding job now.

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Quote:
Original post by Pixel Bob
Also, do you think i'm a little old to start programming seriously? I've always felt i have been.


Tell me you're kidding... there are CSci students your age who hadn't seen a computer until they got to college. Ya make me feel old, and I'm 23 (Like when people here talk about "The older Zelda games" and are talking about Ocarina of Time!).

You should hit up the US West Coast, that's a place where fifty is still a little green! :)

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Quote:
Original post by Way Walker
(Like when people here talk about "The older Zelda games" and are talking about Ocarina of Time!).


Yeah, whats up with that? Damn young-ins got no respect for the NES. [lol]

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Actually, come to think of it, i was thinking about the modified NVIDIA drivers that are available lastnight from various sources e.g. XG, Omega, Starstorm and those sorts and looking into the technicalities of why software such as drivers are modified to gain better performance interests me a lot and as such i wouldn't mind creating sets of drivers myself but i was wondering how exactly that would fit into programming in general. Also, i'd need a name. =)

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University courses are beginning in January when i start a Computing Diploma Online with Oxford University, the course lasts for 2 years and is £850 a year, which in total, is about a 10th of the total cost some students pay in total for a 4 year course.

Now, due to a financial problem my fiance is having justnow, i'm having to sell my games, most of which i don't actually play as i'm becoming an "under the hood" enthusiast, so still fumbling around with whether or not to install MSVC++ after the headache of 10,000 redundant registry entries is left me with last-time, i guess it's time to look elsewhere.

Now, do i look more like a "n00b" than ever? Where to go, what to do? OpenGL and C++, or BASIC and OpenGL with a small program called BASIC4GL. Now, i would be more inclined to go along with BASIC because it's easy to learn, teaches good programming habits and structures and is also widely available to research on the internet or do i look into OpenGL and C++ because of its relevance to modern langauges?

I've always thought that BASIC would act as a stepping stone, especially seeing as i can't trust a lot of C++ coding i find on the internet due to poor syntax.

Also, my Visual C++ installer seems to still think that the program is installed even though it's not, any worked around to this at all? I really don't want to have to use system restore.

[Edited by - Pixel Bob on September 7, 2005 11:00:01 PM]

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If you're set to learn C++, I'm not trying to talk you out of it. But if you're just looking around to see what can be done, C# with DirectX might be a good place to start for you. The C# API enforces the use of OO design principles, so that's a plus when you're starting off, and I personally found it a lot easier to learn than C++.

For the free VS C# IDE, go here:

http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/express/


And to get the Managed DirectX SDK, go here:

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/directx/default.aspx


NOTE: I'm not evangelizing C# -again-, just thought I'd give Pixel Bob an alternative :) Oh, and welcome to the boards!

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Thanks for the help, it's much appreciated, now i can uninstalled Dev C++ and look forward to C#. I've heard a lot about C# and how the sytax has changed into some cases,but overall i suppose it's better to look into it. As for the Free IDE, is it only Free during the Beta period and then i have to pay a small fee to purchase the full application or is a product that MS ship for budding programmers for free?

As for DirectX, i was looking more into OpenGL and have the first two Lessons downloaded from NeHe's website, so is there anything wrong with not learning DirectX?

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Quote:
Original post by Pixel Bob
As for DirectX, i was looking more into OpenGL and have the first two Lessons downloaded from NeHe's website, so is there anything wrong with not learning DirectX?


No, OpenGL is good and portable graphic API.

This article might good to read: http://www.gamedev.net/reference/articles/article1775.asp

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I started C++ when I was 18, so you are not too old. There is a bit of a learning curve. So if you don't understand it much right now, don't worry and keep plugging along. It took me awhile to completely move away from VB because I could do better graphics and winsock with VB a lot easier than when I was using C++. But this is not the case anymore and I don't open up VB anymore.

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Thank you for your replies, i can't believe there are so many and i haven't yet replied to another thread bar this! Now, i now 64 bit technology is becoming mainstream and i though i had best join this sooner rather than later.

Now, since i'm obviously not going to need a "uber gaming system" to program, and my parents aren't earning as much money as they were, i've decided to look into the now "aging Socket 754" series with an AMD 64 Sempron 3400+ 2.0GHz and a stable motherboard to accompany which will be more beneficial with its 64 bit support and i can easily move my 160GB Seagate HDD, my NVIDIA GeForce 6600GT 128MB AGP graphics card and my 1GB of PC3200 (2 X 512MB) GeIL RAM which is actually Dual Channel supporte but i rather doubt the need for Dual Channel at all.

Does this seem like a wise idea?

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