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kelcharge

Think your smart, I thought I was...

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It's also not specified how high off the ground the cylinder is and how long the chain is. Clearly if the top of the cylinder is less than a foot off the ground, it will be impossible to raise the bar more than a foot. And if the chain isn't long enough, you might never be able to raise it in the first place. And if the chain is too long, it'd take a good deal more turning of the cylinder to raise it above the ground.

[Edited by - kSquared on September 7, 2005 10:04:45 PM]

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Plus it's not specified in which axis the cylinder turns. If you turn the cylinder in the vertical plane, then the answer will depend on how long the cylinder is and at which point you rotate it (both of which weren't specified). So everyone's answer can be deemed correct [smile].

This is why you need to think like a lawyer when you write mathematics questions. Students always try to weasel their way through everything. [wink]

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Quote:
Original post by Trapper Zoid
Students always try to weasel their way through everything. [wink]


Rascally students!

When I first read it I was confused by the chain being on the bottom; If the cylinder is lying on its side, shouldn't one of the ends be the bottom? [smile]

Kelcharge, you bring that teacher here so we can keelhaul him! [wink]


-Josh

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It also depends on whether the chain winds over itself on the cylinder, the thickness of that chain, as well as the point on the metal bar at which the chain is attached, and the length of that bar. We may also need the chain's modulus of elasticity, moment of inertia, and linear mass, as well as the mass of the bar.

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Quote:
Original post by Fruny
It also depends on whether the chain winds over itself on the cylinder, the thickness of that chain, as well as the point on the metal bar at which the chain is attached, and the length of that bar. We may also need the chain's modulus of elasticity, moment of inertia, and linear mass, as well as the mass of the bar.


[lol]

GameDev.net, turning even the simplest problems into rocket science.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
You people are so silly.

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your also forgetting, if you were to rotate it 90 degrees, it has already lifted, it has infact lifted 5 inches.

**edit** whoops, no your not, read the first reply of 170 degrees wrong, sorry :(

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Guest Anonymous Poster
If the wire is the exact length from the bottom of the cylinder to the ground, and the wire is perfectly elastic, then 137.5 is the only solution to the problem because exactly 12in of wire is wrapped around the cylinder which means the bar is 12 inches off the ground; unless the wire broke or slipped off the cylinder for some reason.

--noone

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