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SelethD

Is Dev Cpp any good?

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I am trying to find a good free c++ compiler that can make programs in windows, hopefully games. I was thinking of using the lib crystalspace also. So is thsi dev cpp a good compiler? and does anyone know how well it will work with crystalspace? thansk

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Dev-CPP isn't a compiler. It is an IDE. GCC is the compiler. Dev-CPP uses the MinGW port of GCC as the compiler. It is good enough.

Whether or not Dev-CPP is a good IDE depends on who you're talking to. I personally use Code::Blocks directly with MinGW

Considering that Crystal Space does have a Linux version, I am confident that it will work well with GCC.

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Quote:
Original post by Fruny
I personally use Code::Blocks directly with MinGW


Taking that as a suggestion, I'd second it. :)

In the area of IDEs: while Dev-C++ has been around longer, Code::Blocks has a larger team of developers and is seeing more activity and more releases. The one problem (pet peeve, really) I had with it (no end-of-line whitespace removal) was remedied in the CVS just a few weeks ago, so I'm in the midst of switching over to using it as my primary IDE rather than MSVC++.

Add to what I've already mentioned the fact that it works with both GNU and Microsoft compilers, and you've got yourself a good IDE.

Cheers,
Twilight Dragon

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Personally speaking, I've tried Dev-Cpp over the years, and although I supported the effort, it was always buggy, and sometimes significantly so (ie. being unable to work if you installed it in 'program files', for example). Then Code::Blocks came along and worked somewhat better as soon as I saw it. The only thing Code::Blocks lacked when I last used it a few months back was Find-In-Files, which may have been fixed now. You might also find it a little tougher to use libraries with Code::Blocks than Dev-Cpp since Dev-Cpp has the DevPaks, but apart from that, I have to recommend Code::Blocks (choose the "with MINGW compiler" download).

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I also would like to suggest that you try Code::blocks, it's flexible and has most necessary features. I had some trouble with it constantly eating 50% of my CPU-cycles, though, which was quite annoying.

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Quote:
Original post by TDragon
Quote:
Original post by Fruny
I personally use Code::Blocks directly with MinGW


Taking that as a suggestion, I'd second it. :)

In the area of IDEs: while Dev-C++ has been around longer, Code::Blocks has a larger team of developers and is seeing more activity and more releases. The one problem (pet peeve, really) I had with it (no end-of-line whitespace removal) was remedied in the CVS just a few weeks ago, so I'm in the midst of switching over to using it as my primary IDE rather than MSVC++.

Add to what I've already mentioned the fact that it works with both GNU and Microsoft compilers, and you've got yourself a good IDE.

Cheers,
Twilight Dragon


Thirded, while Dev-C++ is good, I also prefur Code::blocks as my free IDE of choice. It feels more complete than Dev-C++ to me and the fact that it works with GNU, MS, and Borland compilers out of the box (if they're installed) is great. Visual Studio is still my main IDE, but I imagine thats because I'm not doing anything intended for cross-platform release currently, but for the price Code::blocks can't be beat, IMHO.

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I got a free version of Visual Studio from my school, your school might offer the same thing. Just ask one of your teachers. As far as I can tell, nothing is missing in this "educational" edition of Visual Studio. If I were to use something else then Visual Studio, I'd use Code::Blocks. As far as C# development, I use Visual Studio or #Develop.

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I think the educational release of Visual C++ requires you to purchase a full licence if you want to sell the software generated with it. That's the situation with the MSDN Academic Alliance at the University I attend. I used Dev C++ for the C++ portion of my schooling for that reason. MinGW is totally free of charge unless you want to make a donation to their page on SourceForge.net . I haven't used code::blocks so I can't comment on it but if it has a Linux version as well as Windows I may have to look into it.

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Yeah I have a educational version, but I am wanting to perhaps make a bit of money, if I can create anything worth selling.

Thanks so much for the info, ill try that Code::Blocks

I forgot to say I was wanting somthing to run in Windows XP, but from what it looks these should do good.

Ill post again if I have any trouble with that code::bl;ocks since it appears a lot of you have experience with it.

Thanks again.

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