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DeadXorAlive

Building Boost: simple question

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Building the Boost libraries wasn't as hard as I thought it was. But I still have two questions: 1. I build boost simply using 'bjam "-sMINGW_ROOT_DIRECTORY=f:\codeblocks" (etcetera) "-sTOOLS=mingw" install'. Is there anything I should have done different? For example, should or could I build it with some optimizing compiler settings like -O3? How would I do that? 2. 'Getting started' says that "...a single Boost library build with the default will produce eight different libraries." But I got about 28 different libraries! For example, these seem like duplicates, they are the same size: 'libboost_filesystem-mgw.lib' and 'libboost_filesystem-mgw-1_33.lib.' Then I have some libraries with names such as 'boost_filesystem-mgw.lib,' 'boost-filesystem-mgw_1_33.lib' and 'boost-filesystem-mgw_1_33.dll.' Which ones can I delete? I would only use the static libraries. And are the debug versions of any use to me? (Total size of all the libraries is about 1.5 Gb). I am quite the novice. Thanks. [Edited by - DeadXorAlive on October 5, 2005 10:30:37 AM]

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In answer to your first question, no, what you have should be sufficient to build the libraries correctly, optimizing where needed.

The sentence from the docs that you mentioned is a little unclear; what it actually means is that for every single library in Boost, up to eight library files will be produced. These correspond to debug and release, static and dynamic, multithreading vs. singlethreading builds. Read the section in the build doc about how the files are named (there's a nice diagram that separates the names into components) to see which ones you want to delete.

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Thanks. Then I suppose I'm good to go. Very happy I am, because the boost libraries look really nice.

I still don't know what these debug versions are for. Do I need them to use the debugger for my own code? (using the GDB with code::blocks).

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Not for debugging your own code; but if you want to step into the boost library and see why what happens inside happens, as is often handy when debugging, then you'd need them.

And yes, the Boost libraries are very nice. :)

Cheers,
Twilight Dragon

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