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iequalshane

Which Linux For Testing?

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Last week I began to redo my game engine from scratch after a major computer hardware failure. Currently I'm attempting to make my engine as cross platform as possible and I need to know which free linux boot that can interact/use ntfs would be best to use for this purpose? Also, which IDE would be best to use with gcc for C++ programming on both windows and linux. I have a Knoppix boot CD that I could install on a small harddrive I have and I'm currently using Dev C++ for windows in order to get rid of my MS VS dependence. My knowledge about linux is actually semi limited and I need the transitions to be painless as possible while keeping the latest support for graphics drivers, sound drivers, etc. I am in no way new to programming, I just rarely touch a linux machine. Thanks ahead of time for all your help.

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Original post by iequalshane
Last week I began to redo my game engine from scratch after a major computer hardware failure.


Next time I recommend taking regular backups.

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Currently I'm attempting to make my engine as cross platform as possible and I need to know which free linux boot that can interact/use ntfs would be best to use for this purpose?


No Linux distribution can easily access ntfs read/write. There is a driver which allows you to use the Windows NTFS driver - but this is not particularly legit.

All Linux distros will allow you to easily read from a NTFS partition.

I believe there is some kind of distro which will install using a "loop" filesystem on a NTFS partition (i.e. using a single large NTFS file to store its filesystem), but I wouldn't recommend it.

Repartitioning is best, and use a FAT32 partition for sharing working files.

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Also, which IDE would be best to use with gcc for C++ programming on both windows and linux.


The main one I know of which supports Linux *and* Windows is Code::Blocks.

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I have a Knoppix boot CD that I could install on a small harddrive I have and I'm currently using Dev C++ for windows in order to get rid of my MS VS dependence. My knowledge about linux is actually semi limited and I need the transitions to be painless as possible while keeping the latest support for graphics drivers, sound drivers, etc. I am in no way new to programming, I just rarely touch a linux machine.


Lots of people develop cross-platform games; usually the trick is to use a library written by someone else who understands the platform differences much better than you.

Popular ones are GLFW (GL context creation / input), SDL (GL context creation, input and software rendering support to some extent) and OpenAL (audio).

Mark

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