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sriniatig

what does texel per second mean?

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I would like to know exactly, what is texels per second? How is it related to the screen size and resolution? How does one take it as a benchmark result?

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A "texel" is an abbreviated form of "texture pixel", and texels per second is a measure of how fast the video can transform textures in video memory onto surfaces in video memory.

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Quote:
Original post by TDragon
A "texel" is an abbreviated form of "texture pixel",


I'm pretty sure:
pixel = picture element
texel = texture element

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Quote:
Original post by TDragon
Well, considering textures are composed of pixels...


They aren't, they are composed of texture elements(texels). A 256x256 texture doesn't have to be 256x256 pixels when drawn.

See this if you think it is texture pixels.

But when first introduced to texels it is easiest to think of them as pixels in a texture.

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So textures as stored on the hard drive or in memory are not composed of sequential numeric values representing various color levels? Referencing an article that contradicts itself doesn't go very far toward clearing things up...

Not that I don't believe you, but it seems like you're making a distinction that depends on semantics.

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I'd have to agree with CTar on this one. I've always heard them referred to as texture elements and it definately is possible for more than one pixel to map to one texture element or vice versa. (Hence the need for mip/mag mapping).

As far as Dragon's contention- of course they are represented as color values on the disk. So I'd say your both right, but CTar is a little more explicit in his description.

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Suppose I have a 256x256 texture and my screen resolution is 200x200. After profiling if I get a higher count of texels, what does it actually mean in terms of performance? i.e. is the screen rendering is based on this texel performance and if yes how? Can you'll give me a more detailed analysis.

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Quote:
Original post by TDragon
So textures as stored on the hard drive or in memory are not composed of sequential numeric values representing various color levels? Referencing an article that contradicts itself doesn't go very far toward clearing things up...

Texels and pixels are in most cases represented 100 % the same, I personally cant see any difference between them in memory or on a file, but a texel is just the term you use for a element in a texture and a pixel is the term you use for the element in a picture, even though they are similar.

Just like a pixel and texel, there is also a voxel which is a volume element and are also represented the same way as pixels and texels, but still got a different name. So you could argue a voxel is a volume texel, but it is pretty clear that it isn't and then it would also be "extracted" to:
volume texture picture element.
Or in the case of the texel it would be like this:
texel =
texture pixel =
texture picture element

Quote:

Not that I don't believe you, but it seems like you're making a distinction that depends on semantics.


I'm not making a distinction I have just read that there were a difference and pointed it out. I dont hope you are offended in any way, just wanted to make sure all info was correct.

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sriniatig
Suppose I have a 256x256 texture and my screen resolution is 200x200. After profiling if I get a higher count of texels, what does it actually mean in terms of performance? i.e. is the screen rendering is based on this texel performance and if yes how? Can you'll give me a more detailed analysis.

texels/ second basically is measuring how fast you can apply the textures of the scene to the screen. I believe it is basically saying how many triangles can be textured per second. (I could be mistaken about this)

So if you are doing a complicated texture layering algorithm or some sort of multipass texturing you will most likely have a drop in texels/sec. If you are just doing simple one pass texturing then you will have a higher texel/sec rate.

[edit]
fixed some typos

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