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DOS32: The Ressurrection

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... yes I am working on it but it will not be available until I feel it safe to run on actual hardware. now back to the show. [Edited by - Name_Unknown on October 9, 2005 9:55:37 AM]

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Wow, I applaud you. I used to love DOS, my old 24Mhz IBM PS2 with 2MB RAM and a 130MB hard drive was rock stable wen running DOS and quite reliable when running Windows 3.11. I also learned my first programming language through DOS. Well actually a DOS app that was known as MS QBasic [grin] Anyway, I think I still remember batch programming as well. Keep up the work, and provide links.

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Original post by RDragon1
Wait so... why not just use linux? (honest question - what's different / better ?)




[Edited by - Name_Unknown on October 28, 2005 8:38:16 AM]

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And from all my playing around, DOS still beats the tar out of Windows or Linux when it comes to raw performance because it is so minimal...


Ignoring the facts that

- DOS's IO drivers are all using the BIOS, hence *CRIPPLINGLY* slow *AND* don't multitask properly
- DOS's network drivers are problematic at best, *AND* because they are all in 16-bit mode, must use the first 640k as a "bounce" buffer, therefore, *CRIPPLINGLY* slow.
- DOS's video cannot use any hardware acceleration at all on modern cards (not even rectangle fills or blits)
- A lot of modern hardware simply doesn't work on DOS at all. DOS drivers exist for the more common stuff (USB storage, input), but not anything more obscure.
- The basic premise of DOS - a 16-bit OS - doesn't scale well to the amount of memory in modern machines. Bounce buffers are required for everything, which makes IO slower than a pregnant snail.

The 640k memory limit is a fundamental weakness, and although you can run 32-bit programs with a dos extender, they don't enable IO drivers to work in 32-bit mode, hence they're slow.

So unless you have your own OS on top of dos (a la win95), you won't ever get decent performance. And look at how amazingly stable win95 was :)

So, CPU performance of DOS in 32-bit mode: no different from Linux / Windows (after all, it's the same machine)

IO performance of DOS in any mode == really slow.

Mark

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Quote:
Original post by Name_Unknown
And from all my playing around, DOS still beats the tar out of Windows or Linux when it comes to raw performance because it is so minimal...


Ignoring the facts that

- DOS's IO drivers are all using the BIOS, hence *CRIPPLINGLY* slow *AND* don't multitask properly
- DOS's network drivers are problematic at best, *AND* because they are all in 16-bit mode, must use the first 640k as a "bounce" buffer, therefore, *CRIPPLINGLY* slow.
- DOS's video cannot use any hardware acceleration at all on modern cards (not even rectangle fills or blits)
- A lot of modern hardware simply doesn't work on DOS at all. DOS drivers exist for the more common stuff (USB storage, input), but not anything more obscure.
- The basic premise of DOS - a 16-bit OS - doesn't scale well to the amount of memory in modern machines. Bounce buffers are required for everything, which makes IO slower than a pregnant snail.

The 640k memory limit is a fundamental weakness, and although you can run 32-bit programs with a dos extender, they don't enable IO drivers to work in 32-bit mode, hence they're slow.

So unless you have your own OS on top of dos (a la win95), you won't ever get decent performance. And look at how amazingly stable win95 was :)

So, CPU performance of DOS in 32-bit mode: no different from Linux / Windows (after all, it's the same machine)

IO performance of DOS in any mode == really slow.

Mark




[Edited by - Name_Unknown on October 28, 2005 8:47:31 AM]

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