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newOperator

Suitable C/C++ compiler with these criteria

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I'm looking for a good C/C++ compiler to do some OpenGL stuff with. And yes I'm pretty much a newbie Graphics programmer. My current constraints are these: 1.) Non-gui installation (the biggest) I just want to do things right on the command line. 2.) I was thinking of using Watcom's compiler but the last news report was from last year and I'm not sure if the OpenWatcom is being supported. 3.) I would like to just set up the project from scratch, that is start with a directory, and then add files like the right headers, and such to the directory structure. I don't want to have to rely on Visual Studio to "keep" these files some place "special". 4.) I don't mind writting and maintaining my own Make file, or possibly an ant file, becuase you can use "ant" to build C++ programs too. 5.) Yes and it must be for Windows. Is there a reason that an Easy to Install and run compiler is difficult to find and unpack on a Windows system? Any good suggestions for a compiler here? Prefereable open source? Sorry for all of this, I just don't want to use VS, and I'm not having much luck with the MinGW and Cygwin stuff and figuring at how the distribution expects everythiing to be set up. Thanks for your help in advance, newOp

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Original post by newOperator
Is there a reason that an Easy to Install and run compiler is difficult to find and unpack on a Windows system?

Any good suggestions for a compiler here? Prefereable open source?

Sorry for all of this, I just don't want to use VS, and I'm not having much luck with the MinGW and Cygwin stuff and figuring at how the distribution expects everythiing to be set up.

I have to say, I've never had any trouble setting up Visual C++ or MinGW, the two primary compilers I use. MinGW in particular is incredibly simple -- just run the installer and install to C:\MinGW, then add C:\MinGW\bin to your PATH environment variable.

Without more details about what problems you've had previously installing compilers/IDEs, it's hard to recommend a product to you.

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Original post by Prototype
Best part of it is that is is completely free.


Well, free as in bread at least; it's not free as in speech. (Not open source, restrictions on usage and redistribution.)

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Original post by TDragon
Well, free as in bread at least; it's not free as in speech. (Not open source, restrictions on usage and redistribution.)


Open source is a rather ill requirement for a compiler, unless you are crazy enough to try to improve it. The EULA doesn't mention anything about limitations, so could you point me to somewhere where that is indicated? (I'm quite sure you are allowed to even make commercial applications with it)
And uh.. free bread > free speech. Especially when it is the best bread around.

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Just for the record, I agree with you; but the OP did mention open source as a requirement.

Also just for the record:
Quote:
from the Microsoft Visual C++ .NET 2003 Toolkit EULA
11.SOFTWARE TRANSFER. The initial user of the Software may make a one-time permanent transfer of this EULA and Software to another end user, provided the initial user retains no copies of the Software. This transfer must include all of the Software (including all component parts, the media and printed materials, any upgrades to this EULA, and, if applicable, the Certificate of Authenticity). The transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a consignment. Prior to the transfer, the end user receiving the Software must agree to all the EULA terms.

Quote:
from redist.txt
There are no redistributable files (i.e., dll's/cab's, etc.) included with the Visual C++ Toolkit 2003. Object library files included with the Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 (e.g. the C Runtime Library static libraries designated with the suffix ".lib") will be automatically linked to your program when they are compiled by the Visual C++ compiler and linker. Inclusion of these static libraries as compiled into your program is acceptable; you may not, however, redistribute the static libraries standalone - on their own.


Basically, sections 1-3 give you your rights in that area, and section 4 reserves for Microsoft everything else.

But as free bread goes, it is indeed a good'n'. [grin]

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