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NPC Comments

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Hi everyone, I'm currently working on White Rock, an innovative FPS from New Era Games. Its basically a WWIII scene that includes a lot of trench warefare. So, basically I was wondering what type of comments you'd have the soliders make while standing around idly? Secondly I was wondering if there were any phrases or comments you have wished to hear throughout a game? Due to our small team we lack the variety of comments we would like to put into the game, so any suggestions are more than welcome!

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Read this book.

It answers your question completely. It even happens to have examples of what the player's comrades-in-arms might say in various situations (and why), including things the company cook might say before or after a mission.

Chris Crawford's books are also good. I found this book to be useful as a dialog writing tool in providing meaning behind the NPC, whereas Crawford's books are more of an implementation view.

Anybody writing dialog for an NPC should know about this or similar books.

frob.

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Complaining about the quality of equipment.

Complaining about their commander.

Bragging about how many women they've slept with, how much they had to drink the other night, or just general locker room guy talk.

War stories, usually with plenty of exaggeration.

Here's a post I wrote a while back that had some of this stuff in it.

http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=348802

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You might consider having diffrent types of personalitys for soldiers.

Not all soldiers gloat about their kill count, some would be scared shitless for being in the war to begin with.

Some might be a quiet badass, men of few words.

Some might be x-cons that are forced to be there...

I think my best suggestion is grab those stereo-types and run with them!

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Welll if read up on WWI which is when trench warfare took place not WWII. You will discover that most of the comments where along the lines:

Complaining about the mud
Complaining about rats
Complaining about the food
Worries about the various diseases they caught
Fear about being order of the wall.

and so on.

The non german trenches where not very nice places, they where damp and muddy, and rats and disease where a constant problem.

here's a link to site with memories of life in the trenches it should give you some ideas on npc dialog.

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/memories_from_the_trenches.htm

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Quote:
Original post by TechnoGoth
Welll if read up on WWI which is when trench warfare took place not WWII. You will discover that most of the comments where along the lines:

Complaining about the mud
Complaining about rats
Complaining about the food
Worries about the various diseases they caught
Fear about being order of the wall.

and so on.

The non german trenches where not very nice places, they where damp and muddy, and rats and disease where a constant problem.

here's a link to site with memories of life in the trenches it should give you some ideas on npc dialog.

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/memories_from_the_trenches.htm


He says WWIII not WWII ;)

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I'm not sure how much thought you've put into this, but you'll run into a problem when you start designing gameplay: There are reasons we don't have trench warfare anymore, and the biggest one is tanks. Read up a little on why there weren't a lot of trenches iin WWII, and why there haven't been any more recently, and you'll see.

I'm guessing that WWIII will be futuristic, with all kinds of nifty gizmos and such. Trenches are about as effective in modern warfare as the british square or the socket bayonet.

Just a thought.

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Original post by Iron Chef Carnage
I'm not sure how much thought you've put into this, but you'll run into a problem when you start designing gameplay: There are reasons we don't have trench warfare anymore, and the biggest one is tanks. Read up a little on why there weren't a lot of trenches iin WWII, and why there haven't been any more recently, and you'll see.

I'm guessing that WWIII will be futuristic, with all kinds of nifty gizmos and such. Trenches are about as effective in modern warfare as the british square or the socket bayonet.

Just a thought.


You never know, he could explain through technoligy why trench warfar has come back about. What if we are able to neutralize just about kind of enemy "armor" or long range weapon to attack, in essense our technoligys cancel each other out. We could be reduced to trench warfar again...

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Quote:
Original post by Iron Chef Carnage

I'm guessing that WWIII will be futuristic, with all kinds of nifty gizmos and such. Trenches are about as effective in modern warfare as the british square or the socket bayonet.


Air strikes and highly accurate artillery strikes are another reason. Digging into trenches doesn't make sense in anything except pure infantry warfare.

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Original post by Paradoxish
Quote:
Original post by Iron Chef Carnage

I'm guessing that WWIII will be futuristic, with all kinds of nifty gizmos and such. Trenches are about as effective in modern warfare as the british square or the socket bayonet.


Air strikes and highly accurate artillery strikes are another reason. Digging into trenches doesn't make sense in anything except pure infantry warfare.


Brings back my comment on how technoligy could cancel it self out...

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