Sign in to follow this  
Ultimate_Fusion

how are computer game cutscenes made?

Recommended Posts

I think you can make them a couple of ways. I believe in some 3d modeling programs you can make an animated scene and render it and export to an avi. Then you play the avi in game for your cutscenes. Or you could render it realtime in the game. Thats the way we do it. It's pretty easy you just throw in your meshes, music and stuff and tell them what to do. Except for the cutscene obviously the player isn't controlling anything. Does that make sense? The benefit to rendering it in a 3d modeling program and exporting to an avi would be that you could do much higher quality. Where as if you render it realtime in the game your going to be limited by your engine and what the video card is capable of. Hopefully this all makes sense. Oh and I am by no means an expert either. So if anyone else is please tell your experience.



beteogames

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
With hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars and very large teams of people.

If you're asking how to make CG in general, try the 3D and 2D software thread stickied at the top of this forum. Something like Blender would give you a good idea of how it all starts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well it can take millions of dollars and large teams of people. But if you are a good 3d modeler and artist. You should be able to do just fine on your own or at least with a good programmer as well. My small indie company is only myself and one programmer and we have made some pretty decent cutscenes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are three main ways:

1) Render a scene just like you'd render a cartoon, or commercial. You build the environment and meshes in a modeling/animation program (such as 3dsmax) and render out the scene, just like a movie.

Plus side: this allows your cut scenes to look better than your in-game graphics.
Plus(?) side: on the box and web screen shots, you can include sections of cut scene to make the game look better than it is.
Minus side: this requires more art to be created (separate models for cutscene).
Minus side: the player will notice that the quality changes between game and cutscene.
Minus side: there's usually an abrupt cut between game and cutscenes.

2) Animate the in-game meshes using long, canned animations. You set up the animations just like you'd set up a walk cycle, except much longer. You also typically animate the camera.

Plus side: uses game assets, so melds much better with gameplay.
Plus side: can run these "parallel" with player interaction, for better immersion.
Minus side: harder to special-case certain effects; especially in the static environment (breaking walls etc).

3) Sometimes, you set up higher goals (such as "walk to here") using some scripting language, and let the game mechanisms take care of the rest. Warcraft III is an example of this.

Plus side: much faster to create cut scenes.
Minus side: not the same degree of control as in case 2).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this