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Long Term Motivations - am I alone to question this?

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This is less coding question and more a theory question/comment. I wanted to post it here becuase any where else would have fallen on deff(sp?) ears. I've been working on my own game in my spare time after work over the last two years and I've got over three hundred hours of coding in so far. In addition I've been checking out other peoples games which they have writen. ("Other peoples" as in a one person team.) When they get done, a lot of people comment, "Wow this brings me back, I remember playing this kind of game when I was young." So passionate people start on games which are "current & modern" and complete a game which is considered "a classic." So most good games of today take a team of five about three years to get to market. (The numbers: 2000 hours per person per year, full time, times 5 times 3 is 30,000 hours total) and here I'm planing to be done with my game in about ten years or more because I'm doing it in my spare time. Yes, my motivation is to play a MMO game which I've been wanting since 2001. So two years ago I gave up on waiting and started to write it. It's for a nitch market and I can reach my target audience. But ten years from now, it might be a classic and I'd getting home from work and turning on my game and jumping on-line to,.... to what? To play with myself?! Ya, so I could just open source the game and allow like minds to code and take it in different directions which I don't want it to go in. Although, my biggest fear is that a big name game company could get wind of this idea and with some adjustments to one of thier own game they could beat me to market before I get done with my 'equip <weapon>' commands. Then I'd just be telling everyone, "ya that was my idea," and people would be sneering like "Ya, I've heard that before buddy." Yes I plan to make money on this game, but I've got no money to invest in this and I don't think I will have money to invest into this. (Day Job: File Clerk) I don't think any one will paygood money to play a "Classic MMO." Am I alone to question my long term motivations?

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I know what you mean - but if you have a great idea for a game, and you came up with it through a need to play something like it, try selling it to a big game company to make - if they decline it then its for a reason.

I make games / code in general to learn as much as i can about something, in the long term, i just hope it gives me some form of advantage

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From experience I can say, instead of beginning to write a game, which consumes a huge amount of time and often leads to demotivation when you reach a point where development gets stuck due to what ever reasons, I would start with writing small modular and extensible libraries. Or just setup a codebase that can be reused in each project you start.

Beginning with this approach should have better chances to get into a final state.

In the past I planned to create a ww2 FPS with a ton of features, I started several engine projects until I cam to the conclusion, that I don t have the required editors to create content nor do I have a modular engine design


Now a few months back I started to work on a gamedev library which will be free for everyone once its finished and tested. This library includes a huge base code to beginn with and will be reused in the editors and the engine itself

And the pro of this approach is you see some progress every now and then which is a key to motivation

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If your motivation is to make the game you want to play, I wouldn't question it.
The liberating thing about being a small, unfunded independent team is that you can make the game purely the way you want it to be.
Commercial studios have publishers, investors and others fronting the cash - they want to make damn certain they'll get a return. This frequently means toe-ing the line as far as mass market goes (niche make less profit so are often disregarded), concentrating on point-of-sale visuals (fantastic screenies - don't care if they run slow) and ensuring the project comes out on schedule (and on budget).
As an unfunded, or self-funding indie, you don't have these to worry about.
If you can support yourself long enough to get into the project properly, take it seriously and don't burn yourself out, and finally have a bit of cash set aside at the end to host it, there's no reason you shouldn't be able to finish it.
Your concern about timescale is valid though. In order to pull of a large project like this, you can't expect to write all the code yourself. You'll either need to go open source and get assistance, or take the route I chose for my (licensable) game libraries, which is to split the project - portions are built on refactored open source code from (many) other projects. These have to be made open source. The rest doesn't.

Best wishes for your project!


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Awesome advice!

As for quiting my job and chacing my dream, no money in the bank and unemployement is fun and all but it covers everything except food and internet,.... I'm sure you see the down fall.

As for modular parts which can be re-used, it is the plan for my game because there are two other large one's I want to make and connect them so you can move around genras in the same game *evil grin as he napalm's a forest ridge filled with ogre archers, in his orbital bomber* *evil laugh* Ok, sorry I had to twink there.

As for selling the idea to a game company, two things, one they would nuder the damn thing for the biggest market, which is currently flooded. (You've got Everquest 1&2, <something about> camilot, world of warcraft and themed ones like Star Wars Gallaxy's, and off line ones like morrowind.) The nitch I'm going for is Empty and not the market share. There might be a total of 100,000 players world wide who I know I can reach by word of mouth. That's not a big enough market for big business. Second, like open sourcing it, a team would take it in a direction I don't want and then I would come out years later and people would be like, "wow this a clone of this other game,... why would I want to play yours instead?"

Basiror: You've got a good point, and I'm going to be doing more small side projects to draw in coders and artists into helping out. As well as do some small games just test myself and to bring life back into my main game.

_WinterDyne_: Your ponits are quite valid, and I'll think about the best way to do that before I let the cat out of the bag.

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www.xenimus.com

Look at this. I started playing this game when it first came out 4 or 5 years ago; it was free to play then. It was created by one person mainly, though his close, real-life friends helped him with art and music. Originally the designer worked at a bank programming databases, but eventually the game got good enough that he thought he would be able to charge for it (by then the player list is probably 1000 people or more, I'm not really sure). Well, when he started charging, do you think people stuck around? The game had sub-par graphics, it was updated like once a month meaning you had to download stuff all the time, it lacked features, etc. Buuuut... people still stuck around! No one really quit permanently because of the charge (5 dollars a month). About a year after that the game had gotten more feature rich and had an even bigger userbase and he was making enough money to quit his job so he could work on the game, it being his sole income.

The point of the story is, don't give up. If you want to do something you can do something. Keep concentrated and motivated and anything can be done. As long as your on that site, you may as well check out the article at the bottom of the page "Writing Xenimus." It was written about 2 years ago but it is still an interesting read.

Also, the game is still being updated and hes still making enough money to live off of while developing it. I think its a pretty damn good story actually.

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Quote:
Original post by Xpyder
I know what you mean - but if you have a great idea for a game, and you came up with it through a need to play something like it, try selling it to a big game company to make - if they decline it then its for a reason.

Game companies don't buy game ideas -- even good ones. They just don't.

However, if you make your game and they like it, then they might publish it.

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Quote:
Original post by JohnBolton
Quote:
Original post by Xpyder
I know what you mean - but if you have a great idea for a game, and you came up with it through a need to play something like it, try selling it to a big game company to make - if they decline it then its for a reason.

Game companies don't buy game ideas -- even good ones. They just don't.

However, if you make your game and they like it, then they might publish it.


I'll even add a bit more to this :) Game companys probably hear a million ideas day. Don't think that you're idea is even really unique, since they rarely are. What someone will invest in (isn't that what you're really looking for by going to an existing game company...) is people. If you have the drive to execute on your idea and start to become successful then publishers will notice.

Follow your passion/dream and make your game.

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