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Which is better in game programming?!

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hi there, i hope that every one participates with me i was just wondering which is better in game programing ?! 1- to use a full engine. 2- to integrate espcial purpose engines (Physics engine, scripting engine, 3D engine). and why?! thanx in advance

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Sorry for not being clear.

what i've meant was if i used a full engine to develop a game i'll write scripts only mainly there will be no code, besides i'm bounded by the engine. i.e. the 3D pation of the engine might be very great but the associated physics might not be soo good.

On the other hand i'll have the overhead of integrating thoses engines. although i'm able to get the best of each engine, but integration might cause problems with overall performance.

each of them have its benefits and risks.
i'm very confused in maing the choice.
So, i wanted to know what does people think of that situation !?

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A full engine is generally efficient since it is an integrated unit (there's no class conversion going on), but as you've noted, it may not do certain things (which is a problem if it's closed source), or may do certain things badly. If it will do precisely what you want, with minimal modification this is the way to go.

The problem with integrating several different engines together is that quite often you will find the dependencies of these cause issues - each may have their own utility libraries for memory management, file access, logging, 3d representation etc. etc. This can cause the occasional issue with multiple definitions (unless effective namespacing is used), and also results in unnecessary bloating in memory (pretty much the same code is loaded several times by several libraries). Efficiency of passing information between the disparate components also becomes an exercise in class conversion.

Another option is to take open source solutions (of which there are many) and refactor appropriately, bringing each of your chosen libraries into line so that common dependencies are used, or modifying the smaller ones to match the dependencies of the larger. This is the way to go if you want to learn how things tick, or want the best of both worlds and are prepared to put the effort in. It is a lot of work though, not much short of writing the things from scratch, albeit with good examples.

This would mean that you'd have to release the refactored codebase, of course.

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