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scgrn

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scgrn    168
I just received the GoF "design patters" tome, for those of you who that have read this book, in hindsight: -what kind of perspective should i take when i read this? -if you could read this book again for the first time, how would you read it? also, -at what point did thinks 'click' and what process led you there? I'm fairly familiar with OOP, but maybe I'm asking for pitfalls on previously treaded grounds? Dunno. This is the kind of book that I would like to inject directly into my brain. Also, who would win in a fight, chewbacca vs (willie nelson + abstract factory)??

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dave    2187
I think that one thing that alot of programmers fall down is that they tend to go and design code around design patterns. I have always approached it by coding and using a design pattern when the need arises. They are useful but not the solution to all coding problems.

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Nitage    1107
I wouldn't recommend sitting down and reading this cover to cover - just read a few patterns whenever you feel like learning something technical.

I really started to get interested in these things when I realised that a neat bit of code that took me ages to design was actualy an example of one of the patterns - that made me realsie how much time I could save using design patterns.

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Trap    684
Try to find some pattern that does something you already programmed and study that one in detail. How does it compare to your solution, why is it recommended as best practice solution for this problem?

I think learning every pattern in there by heart is overkill, just try to remember which problems can be solved with GoF-patterns so that you can look them up once you need them.

To put things into perspective, read Peter Norvig's article about patterns in dynamic languages.

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scgrn    168
Thanks everyone, that's exactly the kind of feedback I was looking for. After skimming through this book, I've noticed that I've already used most of the patterns that are discussed already, but this will help me think about OOP more clearly.

I think I'll just kinda browse around the book and get a general idea of each pattern, and look up the ones that seem interesting in depth. And thanks for the link, Trap, that's very helpful.

Anyone else's opinion?

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by scgrn
Thanks everyone, that's exactly the kind of feedback I was looking for. After skimming through this book, I've noticed that I've already used most of the patterns that are discussed already, but this will help me think about OOP more clearly.
How you should read it depends on how confident you are in your OO design skills. The book was a great intro to OO for me, I read it from cover to cover and it was very helpful that way[*]. But if you're already quite competent (as it seems), the details won't be that useful for you. Just read the overview of each pattern so that you'll know the rought idea of how each pattern works and where they're applicable.

[*] If I had to jump back a few years and read it again first time, I'd read it from cover to cover again

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_the_phantom_    11250
I didnt read it 'cover to cover' and infact still havent, however I DID read the whole section at the front of the book where they show how they design a program by using patterns to solve various problems in the program.

My take on patterns is to sit down, design what I need todo and then see if it fits a pattern (or is close to one) and impliment it like that.

Infact, I'd advice more or less the total opposite to ace_lovegrove, while coding strictly to patterns probably wont help you using them will more often than not gain you more than it costs you... I'm still haunted by someones design for a GUI system which was discussed on #graphicsdev one night, if the person who wrote it had imployed patterns from the start then it might have turned out much better...

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