Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
cader

How do we really get into it ?

This topic is 4738 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I'm not new to programming. I've already made my one programs and i've learned some stuff in C++ tutorials. i kinda contorl pointers, and i'm quite ok with functions,... but the thing is what's the next step ? should i learn DirectX or openGl ? i found plenty of tutorials but i'm not sure where to start; My first objectif is to try to make a tetris game. i've read that it's a very good exercise for beginning game programming. So... OpenGl ? or DirectX ? Can i have your opinions and maybe some tips to help me understand better. thanx for your help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
For how long have you been doing C++? How much do you really know? One of the worst mistakes you can make is trying to go too fast because you think you already know something. I keep making that mistake and have yet to make anything of quality.

I would proceed like this:
1. Get the know the C++ as well as you can.
2. Study the STL so that you can use it well.
3. Make a text-based game.
4. Learn the basics of windows programming.
5. Learn to use a graphics library of your choice (SDL, OpenGL, Directx).
6. Work on small game projects. A mistake most people make--including me--is to start on something that is too big.

I hope that helps. ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i agree with guyver...though i'd also say you shouldnt venture beyond text till you are comfortable with intermediate data structures like classes and structs...more advanced elements like inheritance and polymorphism can wait.

do something text based, then consider progressing onto graphical. i went onto doing windows GDI, which is a useful middleground in my opinion, though i couldnt say if using, for example, the NeHe tutorials on opengl would be just as useful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Another option would be to look at some of the tutorials you mentioned finding and if they don't make sense, go back to the basics and figure out what you don't understand. There isn't a timer or a bell that is going to chime when you are ready. Only your own understanding of what you read can answer this question for you. Good luck. Either API is equally suited for coding, choose the one you understand the best. Or try both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I disagree that you have to go slow ... or console first, or anything like that ...

I would word it as: You must always realize that the PRIMARY goal is learning to be a better programmer in general, so don't let constantly jumping from one framework / technology to another keep you from studying the craft and improving your fundamentals.

But a basketball player does not become great by first practicing his endurance and his streatching and running for years before starting basketball ... they start by picking up a ball and learning to dribble and shoot. Then they continue doing stretches, and hand exercises, and drills, and running intermixed with the advanced techniques.

I like that for programming too, because it mixes your long term grow in with your quick satisfaction ... I mean when I started with GWBASIC, I learned how to draw a circle before I learned a GOSUB .. because a GOSUB only makes sense to a beginner when it helps you DO SOMETHING you want to do ... and you don't even know what that might be at the beginning ...

So just push out in all directions, and analyze what you think is helpfull and what is tedious, chances are there is always a better way to remove the tedious stuff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd say making an interesting console program would be a good start, judging from what you have said. Not necessarily a game either. One of the first things that I made was a database program which tuaght me alot about arrays, class, and other things. It wasn't particularly useful(it could store the very basics of D&D characters), but it was something that I could do to use the code. I'd recommend doing something like this even before making a game since many of these things are used in games.

You probrably don't want to learn OpenGL or DirectX, yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!