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C++ Books

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Greetings. Let me introduce myself. I'm currently a high school student. In a year, I'll be studying Computer Science in college, and then in university, to finally, and hopefully, become a game programmer. Currently, I mod and level edit for Star Wars Jedi Knight: Dark Forces 2 (I know it's a really old game, but as soon as I get a new PC, I'll move on). Nevertheless, I wanted to start programming with an independent language. After long researches, I concluded that I will learn those programming languages/APIs (in order of learning) before beginning to program game engines: - C++ - C - OpenGL - DirectX - Visual Basic (learn in college) - Java (learn in college) So I was looking for C++ books to help me learning before I go to college. Unfortunately, I bought "Sam's Teach Yourself in 21 days" some time ago. That was a mistake. However, I'm half way through the book, and I learned some basic C++ features (Functions, classes, loops, pointers, references, overloading, etc.) Now, I'd like to buy better books that explain the language fully. I was considering "C++ Primer Plus, 5th edition", by Stephen Prata, and "The C++ Standard Library", by Jossutis, to start with. Are those good choices for someone like me? If not, please suggest books that you think are good for beginners like me.

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Accelerated C++, by Koenig and Moo. The Josuttis book is a 'must-have', also. After those, move on to Meyers' Effective C++, More Effective C++, Effective STL, and then onto some of Sutter's books.

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"Teach your self ANSI C++ in 21 days" is a lot better than the other book but, if you want a full coverage of all the features of the language here it is:

"Bjarne Stroustrup The C++ Programming Language 3rd Ed"
Every aspect of c++ from the creator of C++ , its not the easiest book to learn but it will get you throught.


"Thinking In C++ Part II"
this doesn't just cover the Syntax Aspect of C++ , but the whole development process starting from the idea and ending with the final app.


"Practical C++ Programming"
you can guess from the name , this book is full of real-life applications to test a lot of Functionality in the language << really good.

of course there are other books maybe twice in size as the above covering only one aspect of the language e.g C++ Templates the complete guide , but thats for later , first you take a good grip at the language then you go deep.

Note:
You can see the reviews online at amazon.com it will give you a good idea about the content of the books.

Happy Learning.

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Quote:
Original post by Code Fusion
"Bjarne Stroustrup The C++ Programming Language 3rd Ed"
Every aspect of c++ from the creator of C++ , its not the easiest book to learn but it will get you throught.


This book looks awesome, but reviews tell that it's more a reference than a tutorial. I'm looking for a tutorial. I'll probably buy that later, and use it as a reference.

Also, aren't the "Effective C++" and "Exceptional C++" books about improving your C++ style? I'd like a book covering the language, then when I'll be confident with that, I'll move on and improve my C++ style.

I'll definitely buy Josuttis' C++ Standard Library book. I'm not sure wether to buy "C++ Primer Plus" or the books you suggested. Anyone read that book? On Amazon, it's rated 5 stars, everyone seems to have liked it. It's also listed here.

I want to be sure the book I buy is good.

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if you want the a tutorial then buy "Teach Your Self ANSI C++ in 21 days" its really awesome , after you read it all you gonna need is a refrence and some practising so would be some other book from the ones listed there but then you would be more wise about what you want to do with C++ , you would probably learn what ever left of the language throught Practising.

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