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-xiao-

Language to start with?

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Ha, now that I've asked one dumb question, let me ask another. What language should I begin with (even if it's not gaming, just to learn basic programming). I've heard Python, I've heard C/C++, I've heard Java and I've heard Direct X stuff. I've downloaded a Python compiler, and it seems simple enough, but is it good to learn with.... Some opinions please?

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I personally, would say learn C then C++, but apparently python is easier to learn for beginners (never actually used it myself).

So, try python for a bit and if you like it, concentrate on it. If not, try something else.

What a lot of beginners don't understand (and I suppose there is no particular reason that they should) is that no matter what language you start with, as long as you learn to think about the solution more than the language you are using (it will come with time and experience) then you can learn to use any language on any platform.

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Pick one, any one, its all good. (however, you might want to stick with slightly more mainstream ones. Python, Java, C, C++ are the most common to see on Gamedev it seems. Python and Java can be a little easier for starting, and really aren't as bad as some will make them out to be. If you're starting off, you don't need the 'fastest' running language, but one that is easier to code in!! So what if your first program is using 500% of the resources and time that it could. Unless you're using a Vic20, you're not going to notice the real difference.)

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[opinion]
C++ is bad language to start with. It confuses you with its complexity (no it's not simple and cannot be mastered in just a few weeks!) and that stops you from actually learning *how to program*/make games.

C# and Java are better in that regard, but force the OO paradigm upon you, which is not optimal. Especially considering the huge amount of terrible tutorials out there.

Scripting languages are looked down upon by self-proclaimed "leet" coders, since "it's not real programming".

Just ask yourself what you want to do. Do you want to make your own games quickly, especially in one specific genre? If so - use game maker programs.
Do you really want to learn (game-)programming? Pick a friendly language and go ahead, but don't expect to be able to do anything über-terrific in just a few weeks.

BTW, languages I consider to be "friendly" are mostly scripting languages. Python is fine. Ruby is, too. I would mention Pascal here as well, but everybody hates it [smile].

Basically you can give a few languages a shot and select the one that just "feels right" for you. Just don't let people talk you into using this or that just because "it's what the pros use" or "because xy is too slow" (you'll hear that a lot). Look at some and pick the one you like best.
[/opinion]

HTH,
Pat.

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You gain most from learning Java. While C and C++ are both very good languages, they are slowly being *replaced* by higher-level languages such as C# and Java, and they are also easier to understand and learn.

Doing it in Java means you can make games for any operating system, including cell phones, and run it in a browser as an applet or webstart.
You can make both 2D games (Java2D, built-in) or 3D games, using OpenGL.

If you ever go to college/university, then Java is the language that is being taught and used.


I suggest Java, and a good editor. Eclipse is the one I use.



ps. Learning Python is a waste of time, your time is better spent learning Java.

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Quote:
Original post by -xiao-
Ha, now that I've asked one dumb question, let me ask another.


Go look at my post in the thread "i know nothing want to learn".

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Quote:
Original post by appel
You gain most from learning Java. While C and C++ are both very good languages, they are slowly being *replaced* by higher-level languages such as C# and Java, and they are also easier to understand and learn.

Doing it in Java means you can make games for any operating system, including cell phones, and run it in a browser as an applet or webstart.
You can make both 2D games (Java2D, built-in) or 3D games, using OpenGL.

If you ever go to college/university, then Java is the language that is being taught and used.


I suggest Java, and a good editor. Eclipse is the one I use.



ps. Learning Python is a waste of time, your time is better spent learning Java.


Ok, I see your point in the Java thing. But what backing do you have in that Python is a waste of time. I know several people who have tackled HUGE projects (openEQ, for one, which is the EqEmulator alternative to EQLive) using only Python. I've been told by several it is the easiest and best to learn FIRST. But reading up, I seem to keep coming across that Java is bloated and somewhat limited.
The college I'm most planning to attend only has a basic course in Java. The rest are C/C++ Pascal, Basic, Visual Basic, etc.

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Seriously, to reiterate what has been said, it doesn't matter. Once you learn the basics, migrating to another language is simple. I started in BASIC, switched to Java, and only used Java for years. Then I learned C# in a matter of hours (it's VERY similar to Java) and am in the process of learning C++ which is going quite quickly (I don't like it as much - all the header files and none of the sexy stuff like Garbage Collection provided by the VM), but it's not proving as impenatrably difficult as I thought it would be.

Anyway, if you want to jump right in Java and C# are currently very popular languages taught in schools and are quite practical. Python is similar to those (a bit simpler), and also a good choice. All three of those can be daunting at first but are designed to be safe so if you screw something up it tells you right away rather than find out you crashed your computer 20 minutes later or having some kind of wierd bug you have no idea where it is. I guess I'd say C#, but it's definitley up to you here - the skills you learn in any language can be ported to nearly any other.

Quote:
You gain most from learning Java. While C and C++ are both very good languages, they are slowly being *replaced* by higher-level languages such as C# and Java, and they are also easier to understand and learn.


Compiled languages won't be replaced by interpreted languages any time soon. Even with JIT compilation, there is a speed difference.

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