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seeking publisher list

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I have a title I'm looking to get published, sub note this is big title for the unreal engine not a small shareware title, I'm looking for commercial publishers. I need a link/info/url to publishers are there any databases of potential publishers

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There is a list of publishers on Gamasutra (I think you need to register to get access) Gamsutra publisher list. There are a lot of smaller publishers in there you will need to filter out but the big ones you want should all be there.

You might find some of the articles I have written on publisher submissions useful. Particularly the 6th, 7th and 8th articles on This page.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I have the gamasutra list
http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/contractor_display.php?category=33

some seem small publishers, but the list is quite extensive

Also I have a list from here

http://www.gamersunderground.net/company/game/publisher/index.html

Yep ive read your articles before Dan, very informative read

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I have quite a range of publisher contacts, but the main ones are hard to track down, they do not have contact e:mail addresses on site,I cannot get to these people on the list does anyone have them if so PM me or fill me in on how to contact these people below as I cannot get a hold of anybody


3drealms

Acclaim Entertainment

Activision

Atari

Electronic Arts

SQUARE ENIX

some companies own subsidiary publishers, do you contact the main company that owned them or the subseries ones as well , see below for example
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Take-Two Interactive

Take Two continued to let Gathering run as a fairly autonomous label (much like their other label, Rockstar Games), publishing most of Take 2's non-budget PC games. Eventually Take 2 took over all operations of Gathering, and have since re branded the PC-centric label 2K Games.

so if im not wrong
Take-Two Interactive own these as well

2K Games
Gathering of Developers
GodGames
Rockstar Games
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Microsoft- do these fund games, or do they just deal with xbox,can these be contacted to publish and fund your game.

Midway

Namco

Taito Corporation

THQ

Ubisoft

Vivendi Universal Games

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Best way to contact them is to pick up the phone and call - ask to speak to the person in charge of acquisitions. Sadly a lot of the bigger publishers are very hard to a contact for because they don't work with news start-ups and tend to spend their time chasing established developers. Unless you have made contacts while at a provious employer it can be pretty tough.

Sometimes it can be really really silly. A contact of mine left Activision suddenly. Next time I called up they wouldn't tell me who the new person was and wouldn't put me through unless I knew the name.

There was a discussion on a industry only forum about this issue. I suggested it would be better if publishers listed acquistions contacts and stated what exactly they expect to see in a submission - one acquistions person actually replied "I have better things to do than wade through developer submissions".

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I had one publisher that didn't return my mails and what was funny is that their internal development studio had offered me an lead level design job on their last game, I had to turn it down due to full time dev on my own title. The guy who offered the job, told me to get in touch on my game when I was ready as they are an internal dev to a publisher, unfortunately he left the company so I had lost my contact.

Are there any agents that can get your game across to publishers perhaps thats a good way to do it.

quote- they don't work with news start-ups and tend to spend their time chasing established developers.

What about if you have a game thats 3 months to GM, thats not a start up, plus my company has some of the most experienced people in the industry with the unreal engine, but if you cannot contact the publisher then whats the point, I hear this thing about wading through submissions and I think well how many games are made, I know a lot of shareware games are made, I mean how many titles with a major engine, I hear pubs don't want inandating with submissions by this they must mean a written submission perhaps a demo, but not a game thats vitually done, that takes serious effort and investment, I cannot see them getting lots of those at all, also if they only see people they know then there can be no new developers or new companies, even ones started by industry veterans.

Looking at the way the industry works I think the whole publisher model is not over good, it would be better to look for investment else ware, get rid of the publisher and just look to distribution and find your own capital some place else.

Perhaps its an idea to send your submission on a CD in a case with a nice printed sleeve, that way they see something physical, the artwork on the case would draw them in too look at it.

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Quote:
Original post by Dean Avanti
I had one publisher that didn't return my mails and what was funny is that their internal development studio had offered me an lead level design job on their last game, I had to turn it down due to full time dev on my own title. The guy who offered the job, told me to get in touch on my game when I was ready as they are an internal dev to a publisher, unfortunately he left the company so I had lost my contact.
Similarly I was talking to the VP of development at a major publisher about a project that a client was prototyping. When they couriered it to him (by name) it was returned because they don't accept unsolicited submissions. - We had to fill in a form before they would accept the submission but at no time did the VP bother to mention this and there was no publicly available information on their web site regarding it.

Quote:
Are there any agents that can get your game across to publishers perhaps thats a good way to do it.

There certainly are.

Quote:
What about if you have a game thats 3 months to GM,
It takes 3 month to test and tweak a decent sized PC game so if you are 3 months from GM that means you are code/asset complete to beta? Or do you mean 3 months from beta... which actually means 6 months from GM?

Quote:
...a game thats vitually done, that takes serious effort and investment, I cannot see them getting lots of those at all, also if they only see people they know then there can be no new developers or new companies, even ones started by industry veterans.
Your talking specifically about large publishers. All the companies on your list (apart from 3DR who are a developer, acclaim who went bust and Taito who were bought by another company) are major multi-national publishers. They leave the new, unproven developers to the small publishers.

Quote:
Looking at the way the industry works I think the whole publisher model is not over good, it would be better to look for investment else ware, get rid of the publisher and just look to distribution and find your own capital some place else.
Yes indeed. So why don't you?

Quote:
Perhaps its an idea to send your submission on a CD in a case with a nice printed sleeve, that way they see something physical, the artwork on the case would draw them in too look at it.
Team I am working with sent a submission on a DVD with a printed colour label, in a DVD box with a full colour insert, inside a an outer presentation box (cardboard with various stickers on) along with a full colour printed mock-up of a game manual (control info plus some blurb about the demo) and a DVD with various movie files.

The more professional you make your presentation the better but as always its an issue of cost.

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well most jobs are done in 8 weeks, we put play testing at 8 weeks, we just need money to continue development, plus the unreal engine 3 is not public yet so we need the money for the license, hence we need a publisher for capital.

do you have any info or links for agents, are they any good, are they a good thing to use

on printed DVD cases etc, I already have a nice case with artwork that looks real nice the pitch details is 45 pages with all details laid out, plus its laid out in a convenient way to read so lots of pictures and entertainment for those with attention deficit disorder, plus films etc also you may have a better chance of a publisher looking at it rather than download loads of content of the net, but I fear that if you send them how are you sure the right person has seen them.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Dean Avantido you have any info or links for agents, are they any good, are they a good thing to use


Agents are listed on Gamasutra under Companies. Some are good. The good ones are a good thing to use. The good ones are also very picky about who they represent.

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Quote:
Original post by Dean Avanti
well most jobs are done in 8 weeks, we put play testing at 8 weeks,
Does that time scale include implementing all the foreign language assets and testing the foreign language versions?

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Quote:
Original post by Dean Avanti
nope
So, as I was saying.... three month for testing ;)
It takes 12 weeks to do localisations, and get them implemented into the game and tested. That work can't really start until the 1st language version is at beta (no point in translating text/speech that will change). That's 12 weeks if you have your code set up right to handle localisations and you know what your doing.

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As much as I hate to argue with the man who knows his stuff, isn't it rather commonplace for games to be released in a single (usually large) area and then localised versions released later on?

Further, isn't doing so a sensible approach for higher-risk games, such as those from new developers, to help reduce the costs if the product does fail?

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Original post by Zild
As much as I hate to argue with the man who knows his stuff, isn't it rather commonplace for games to be released in a single (usually large) area and then localised versions released later on?


Nah; if you plan things out carefully in terms of localization, the cost isn't that high, and it can substantially increase your sales. As Obscure said, the bulk of the cost is the added QA, and the localizers themselves (though that can be quite cheap). If, on the other hand, you treat localization as a problem for 'the future', it can get... painfull.. when the time comes to implement it ;)

A lot of publishers insist on Day-and-Date releases across multiple territories; otherwise they loose a LOT of sales to piracy and back-flow channels.

Allan

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Original post by __ODIN__A lot of publishers insist on Day-and-Date releases across multiple territories; otherwise they loose a LOT of sales to piracy and back-flow channels.


Now, this makes sense to me, but still I didn't think it was common practice to release internationally at the same time - I know it certainly felt like this didn't happen in the past.

I must admit that recently I've not really been purchasing games upon release - the last time I looked at doing so was when Rome: Total War came out, and there WAS a considerable delay (two or three months at least) between releasing that in the rest of the world and where I was at the time. Then again, I was in Japan - a country extra-difficult to convert languages to, and relatively small small when it comes to PC games sales.

I guess this is one good thing to come of piracy!

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Quote:
Original post by Zild
As much as I hate to argue with the man who knows his stuff, isn't it rather commonplace for games to be released in a single (usually large) area and then localised versions released later on?
Nope. The norm is to release an EFIGS (Eng, Fre, Ger, Ita, Spa) version day and date. Some US publishers release a US version first and the the Euro version later but, as ODIN pointed out, they take a piracy hit doing that.

Quote:
Further, isn't doing so a sensible approach for higher-risk games, such as those from new developers, to help reduce the costs if the product does fail?
The cost of implementing localisation code is minimal if done up front but can be considerably more so if done at the end of development. Localisation is mainly about planning for the assets. You need to have an asset tracking that maintains the different assets and a build system that will build single or multi-language versions just by setting a flag. You also need to plan for the fact that text files in Fre & Ger is up to 10% larger (can cause memory issues) and that your interface design can handle the languages. Preparing for this upfront costs a few hours thinking and a couple of days extra coding. Doing it at the end can takes weeks and involve trying to solve memory issues, implement new compression or having to strip out other assets to get new localised ones in.

Smart developers also create localisation builds so that the translator can test the localised text in game themselves without bothering the developer.

Quote:
Then again, I was in Japan - a country extra-difficult to convert languages to, and relatively small small when it comes to PC games sales.
Yep Asia isn't included, just Euro languages. Publishers will try to sell a game into Asia but only after the other versions are out the way. Even so a smart developer will make their code base double byte character ready to begin with.

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Thanks again, Obscure! It's actually a very different story from what we have with the (much simpler, non-game) software where I work, but I'll make sure my programming team take this into consideration. (Not saying that the problems are any different, just the way my company handles them!)

Do you have any links to resources with further tips on localisation? Whilst my programming team have experience seeing project through to completion, I'm not sure anyone on my team has any experience with shipping games in multiple languages.

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