Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
cvg_james

Tips and Tricks for Developing Games more Quickly and Easily

This topic is 4522 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I want to present a few tips here and I hope we can get the ball rolling and have people post things they've thought of over time that help streamline the development process. Tools to aid the art pipeline Building solid, easy to use tools that help the artists and models quickly prototype and test changes to art assets will decrease development time by orders of magnitude. Let's say Texture Artist has developed a new texture and he wants to see how it will look -- Several things you could consider trying is developing a Photoshop plug-in that uses the engine the display (while in Photoshop) what the texture will look like in the game. If that is not possible, make it as simple as possible to just look at the texture applied to Some Mesh. The more quickly you can prototype the better. The very same goes for 3D modelers and animators. Make a small app that uses the engine to display the mesh and allows the modeler to test anything he/she may need to see in order to make minor tweaks. Easy file back-up For a very quick and painless way to back-up art assets, source files, anything, I suggest using PKZip (command line) and use a batch file (or your operating system equivalent) and tell it to zip certain folders (you can select which file types to zip and which ones to skip). After that you can copy the files to another drive or system on the network. Design your game/engine to let you prototype and test changes quickly Command consoles and scripting are two examples of ways to let you open the game, jump to a certain level or map, and test changes and feature additions. This is very important and will save you a lot of time. If you design your game/engine right, you can allow yourself to change any variable at run time and test the changes. Can't stress how much that helps tweaking :) Last word: Little things that may take some time to develop in the beginning often save much more time in the long run when you remove redundant steps to execute a simple task. Anyone got anything they would like to share? [Edited by - cvg_james on January 4, 2006 3:14:14 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Quote:
Original post by cvg_james
I want to present a few tips here and I hope we can get the ball rolling and have people post things they've thought of over time that help streamline the development process.

Tools to aid the art pipeline
Building solid, easy to use tools that help the artists and models quickly prototype and test changes to art assets will decrease development time by orders of magnitude.


Tip 0: Use existing tools that other people have debugged for you if possible rather than writing your own.

Tip -1: Where possible, avoid the need for a tool in the first place.

It's very easy to get sucked into doing full blown tools for a game rather than working on stuff that'll make the game better. Unfortunately choosing between an existing tool, a custom tool or avoiding needing a tool is a decision I've still yet to master...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by OrangyTang
Tip 0: Use existing tools that other people have debugged for you if possible rather than writing your own.


The tools I described were really just wrappers around the engine that allowed the artist or modeler to quickly test changes to a texture or mesh in the engine environment. However yes, using solid, tested tools is absolutely good advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
For a very quick and painless way to back-up art assets, source files, anything, I suggest using PKZip (command line) and use a batch file (or your operating system equivalent) and tell it to zip certain folders (you can select which file types to zip and which ones to skip). After that you can copy the files to another drive or system on the network.


Even better would be to have that script "svn commit" to a subversion repository; possibly auto-adding files that aren't currently in the repo. That way, you have versioned backup history basically forever.

Give each developer their own branch for backups, and use merging for "actual commits".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It depends on project. If you have several testing version (with different properties), and would like to work on all of them, creating few directories might be better idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tip 1: Don't use C or C++. There are other languages which are worse to develop games in than C and C++, but chances are that if you use some other language you'll be using a language which is quicker and easier to develop in. Python, Java, and C# are all good choices.

Tip 2: Get as much done as quickly as possible... where "as much" is measured by your average Walmart-goer, NOT by a guy with an OOP fetish. Pretty pictures, surprisingly, are incredibly useful in focusing development.

Tip 3: Source control. CVS, Subversion, whatever. Even if it's just you working on it. Use it religiously. Backup your repository.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!