• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
capn_midnight

Google AFE

9 posts in this topic

trying to clean all the crap off of my mother's new dell laptop. They've really gone overboard with the garbage on these things lately. I bought a dell 3 years ago and it didn't have this much garbage on it. Stuff like 3 different setup programs to install files for AOL, EarthLink, or whatever. Stuff like the Wild Tangent Web Driver. Stuff that nobody should really have on there computer. But, my father wanted the service warranty on the computer, and Dell was the cheapest around, so we went with it. I kick myself in the ass every time I capitulate on that issue, when will I learn? Anyway, on to the confusitoriation. I found something weird called "Google AFE". It's located in c:\program files\GoogleAFE, and has one file "GoogleAE.dll". I don't know why the F is missing, because every other bit of version information refers to it as GoogleAFE.dll. Suprise, suprise, I can't get a google search to return anything meaningful (mostly stuff in spanish or about truck parts). I got an MSN search to return two forum posts where it was mentioned but nobody knew what it was. I have no idea what this thing is, and I don't see where anyone else knows either. One forum post was just inquisitive, one was stating that while it was on his computer, modifying his hosts file to block banner ads caused a strange error message to appear on a dell productification of a google page (incidentally, the default homepage on dell computers these days). After removing it, he said everything worked properly, but still didn't know what it was. Under file properties -> version: File Version: 1.0.0.1 Description: GoogleAFE.dll Copyright: Google(c). all rights reserved Company: Google Product Name: Sample code for GoogleAFE WTF?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you done a registry search for the file name? If not, that might give information about what it's attached to in the system (if anything)

Have you checked if it's under IE's "Tools | Options | Programs | [Manage Add-ons...]"?

You might also want to use some tools from SysInternals, such as Autoruns together with Process Explorer to see if it's used by something that starts up automatically.

I just opened it up in Dependency Walker and the only part of the windows api it uses is all COM-related stuff, so I'd bet it's some kind of shell or browser extension.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did it come with a Windows XP cd? Or did it come with a set of cd's that have the factory image on them? I would say just reinstall windows if you could. It is crazy how much junk comes loaded on a pc now.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by SKATIN_HARD
Did it come with a Windows XP cd? Or did it come with a set of cd's that have the factory image on them? I would say just reinstall windows if you could. It is crazy how much junk comes loaded on a pc now.


yeah, that was my first inclination when the thing arrived two weeks ago, but lo and behold, apparently Dell doesn't think you're entitled to CDs for software you paid for!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The GoogleAFE file seems to be an IE plug-in. From the resource section at the end of the DLL file, it appears to be .NET-related and may be involved in one (or more) of the following:

1. Google Toolbar.
2. Google Desktop Search (unlikely given the file's tiny size)
3. Pop-up blocking
4. A support file for Google's Arabic website. (Probably unlikely.)

Of the four, I'd rank pop-up blocking as the most likely as the program seems to involve looking at the title bars of open windows.



Then again, it could always be a Vast Global Conspiracy.

--
Sean Timarco Baggaley
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by capn_midnight
Quote:
Original post by SKATIN_HARD
Did it come with a Windows XP cd? Or did it come with a set of cd's that have the factory image on them? I would say just reinstall windows if you could. It is crazy how much junk comes loaded on a pc now.


yeah, that was my first inclination when the thing arrived two weeks ago, but lo and behold, apparently Dell doesn't think you're entitled to CDs for software you paid for!


I got a Dell notebook this summer; it came with a tool to let you burn an XP install CD. It installed cleanly, too, with the service packs and drivers but not the extra crap. I think it's in Start->Dell Accessories, but I'm not sure because I've upgraded to XP Pro from MSDN. I was annoyed at Dell that the CD wasn't included, too, but somehow I learned about it on Dell's site. I can't find it now, though.

Apparently they think the majority of computer users shouldn't have a Windows install CD (they might be right), and anyone who should can burn it themselves.

It only lets you burn a single copy before the program deletes itself, though.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, my Dell came with all the CDs. That's really unfortunate that they don't do that anymore. And by unfortunate, I mean stupid.

Which is good, because I've reinstalled Windows about 8 times in two years so far on this PC. On the other hand, I'm completely happy with my Dell warranty, as they've replaced (for free) a power supply, a CPU, two motherboards, RAM, keyboard/mouse, and a DVD drive. Except for the mouse/keyboard, I can't blame the hardware problems on Dell, either.

You should be able to ask Dell to send you the CDs though. I realize you get the crappy support system though (for the non-XPS systems), so that might not be as easy as it should be.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0