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School Thesis, Request For Help.

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Hello everyone! I'm relatively new to the forums, but I've been coming here for a long time. I'm currently developing a title with a few friends, but I'm still a student... and I have to write a thesis paper (on just about anything). The topic I chose was the processing of geometry (or basically any computer generated imagery) and the subsequent display onto the screen... in layman's terms (to help my generalised teacher's ignorance) processing of graphics to show on the computer. However, I'm a complete dolt, and picked this: 'the processing of geometry and the subsequent display onto the screen'. It's the same thing as above. it's a conundrum, I dare say! What I need now, as most of you know, are some references for how this actually occurs... I know how to carry it out, and show it to the teacher, but I need references and sources explaining the process (or at least, listing and somewhat elaborating on the steps) of how geometry is rendered on screen and such. If anyone knows of such sources, please help. I have scoured google (for a personal record of 3 hours, about 4,000 results I actually went to) to no avail. Please assist me, I need to pass, and I actually like this subject matter. Oh, and my mother would stab me with a clothes hanger in the face if I didn't pass. Thanks in advance to all! - Luis P.S. If I posted this in the wrong board, I apologize :)

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Well, what I'm asking is if anyone can find/lead me in the right direction of sources... recommend a book, link me to a website, things of that nature.

Asking for someone to write my paper would be a complete no-no. However, the teacher did say I could ask around (I'm a freshman high-school student, by the way... 9th grade around here [I know it's sometimes higher or lower elsewhere])

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Well, it sounds like you want to know about (a) 3D geometry and affine and projective transformations as they apply to computer graphics, and (b) scanline rasterization of 3D primitives. This is the stuff that most introductory computer graphics textbooks will cover. To pick one at random off the shelf: Hill, Francis. Computer Graphics Using OpenGL. Second Edition. Prentice Hall, 2000. ISBN 0-02-354856-8.

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That's what I was looking for, I just wasn't sure how to say it (I know about technology, but I'm not very familiar with the very deep jargon/terminology).

Thanks a lot, I'll look into that one.

If anyone else has any more reccomendations, please tell me.

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Really, one of the definitive books on computer graphics is:

Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice
by James D. Foley, Andries Van Dam, Steven K. Feiner, John F. Hughes

It's a bit advanced, but I'd challenge anyone to find a better resource for graphics techniques (well, save Abrash's black book, but that's WAY advanced).

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This book is excellent:
3D Graphics Programming: Games and Beyond

It covers the math and the actual processes behind graphics programming starting from line algorithms, going into 2d polygons and then going into perspective transformations and 3d work. A very solid read, a good price, and it's not too long.

It is also a platform and code independant explanation, but there is sample code and an entire engine written and supplied in c++ and a finished chess game. I don't know if it's a better reference than others listed, but if you haven't seen it, I'd suggest giving it a look. It isn't particularly detailed in some areas, but it's a nice reference.

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All those are excellent references, but I have to especially thank the person who gave me the suggestion on what to search. On the first results page, I found this article:

http://www.devhardware.com/c/a/Video-Cards/The-Graphics-Pipeline/

That article is extremely worthwile, and it seems to provide a good amount of detailed, though simple to understand information.

I will be picking up copies of Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, 3D Graphics Programming: Games And Beyond, as well as one of Mr. (or maybe Dr.? not sure...) Abrash's earliest (or possibly first) works, Zen of Assembly Language.

The above mentioned article I found seems very useful, can you guys tell me if it's accurate?

Thank you all very much for your help, it's been great to see how immediate of a response I got from this community.

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Quote:
Original post by gmasterluis
The above mentioned article I found seems very useful, can you guys tell me if it's accurate?

It's accurate, but it may not be quite what you're looking for. That's a treatment of the graphics pipeline as it relates specifically to GPUs. If you're more interested in the underlying theory and algorithms, that information will be less useful to you.

EDIT:
Quote:
...as well as one of Mr. (or maybe Dr.? not sure...) Abrash's earliest (or possibly first) works, Zen of Assembly Language.
A great book, but not closely related to this subject area (though I do vaguely recall a discussion of scanline filling).


[Edited by - Sneftel on January 10, 2006 11:42:41 PM]

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no, the Zen of Assembly Language book would just be for myself, to learn assembly... it's always been interesting to me, and I'd like to know more about it (not use the book as a tutorial, but as a reference).

i see how that article gives the information on how it all occurs... its not in-depth, but it does seem accurate enough for my teacher... its a simple english project, not a technology class project. i dont need to go into excruciating detail, just enough so that she knows whats going on behind-the-scenes once my presentation is said and done.

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Have you taken a look at citeseer? Should give you give you plenty of real references. Here is the mirror at MIT.

Generally it is a good idea actually attempt to read the papers -- you can use the citation count to help you seperate the important ones from the ones that just have flashy titles. Also, don't be afraid of dates. If you are writing about something as basic as geometry processing than many of the ideas have been around for some time. On this sort of subject modern papers will generally focus on some specific aspect and not the general problem. Of course you can always walk the citation tree and find root sources that way, but I doubt you will need (or want) to go that far.

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I second the recommendation for Foley et al. I think Realtime Rendering might have some of this stuff in as well - it's certainly a book any graphics programmer worth his salt should have ready access to a copy of.

Quote:
Original post by Fallen God
Ummm, sorry if im mistaken....but I thought you werent allowed to ask for help with schoolwork?


You are indeed mistaken. We don't allow people to just ask for the board to give them the answer or to write their program for them, but asking for what one needs to enable oneself to do the work is perfectly OK.

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Quote:
Original post by superpig
I think Realtime Rendering might have some of this stuff in as well - it's certainly a book any graphics programmer worth his salt should have ready access to a copy of.

* Pick up book from next to the mouse *

Yeah, Real-Time Rendering Second Edition is a must-have in my opinion. Chapter 2 ('The Graphics Pipeline') covers the various stages at a fairly high level and Chapter 3 ('Transforms') covers the mathematics behind the various stages.

I would say that it isn't the best book if you need hardcore mathematical proof/theory.

However, you haven't specified whether you're interested in graphics as a general subject or the real-time aspect of it. Strictly they are the same thing, but there are some parts of "general 3D graphics" that tend to be ignored or simplified for real-time purposes. For more general graphics stuff, Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice might be more appropriate.

hth
Jack

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