Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Moogle

How good am I?

This topic is 6342 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I am just asking when I can take the step from the console application (called the boring stuff, wihch can only do math and stuff) to a actual WIN32 application. I really like to try OpenGL but I suppose it is above my level (I dont know really). So basically the question is: "What more do I need to learn?" or "Am I programmer enough for the scary APIs" I have done several console math calculators (yuck!), using variables, functions, prototypes, structs, calculations, if..else, loop, if and constants. I am hang of local and global variables (yuck!) and I know the differnce between by value and by refernce! Thanks beforehand /Sebastian Jensen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Guest Anonymous Poster
go for it then....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I started learning C++ by diving right into a DirectX game, so I don''t see any reason why you shouldn''t be ready to move into Windows programming (Please note that since I started with Windows programming I was very confused about things for a very long time. I''m not saying that I''m better than anyone else because I started with windows, but rather that it can be done).

Useless Code

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the replies!
Grabbing a huge piece of self-concidence I scratched my neck and coded a little application showing a messagebox!!!!
The only problem is that I don''t really understand the code...it just works. There is no logic, just chaos, welcome to microsoft everybody!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Programming for Windows is very different than your typical console app program. You need a different mindset to do it well. In a console app you are the one in charge, you say what happens when, when the user can do this or that. In Windows, you sit around and wait for Windows to tell you to do something. You write your app with stuff like "when this event happens do this" - hence the term "event-driven" programming.

Game programming for Windows tends to fall in between in my experience. You don''t necessarily have to lock your self into the pure event-driven message loop model but it''s useful to know it.

I recommend that you write at least one "traditional" Windows app. Something like a hex file viewer. Then you can jump into games.

-Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moogle, you probably just forgot to add this to your upper list, but do you understand pointers?

You''ll need them for any decent game or app, you''ll need linked lists, stacks, trees, et cetera. Pointers are the only good way to do them (incase you didn''t know that). Also the API''s are pointer intensive .



http://www.gdarchive.net/druidgames/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In my opinion, you should just go for it. It really helps to build up your skills imcrementaly, but if you apply yourself to any task after awhile it will become second nature. Sometimes you have to be patient. It took me a long time to learn Direct X. No matter what your level of skill if you get a good book on windows programming and start working at it you will be able to master it.

Mike Barela
MikeB@yaya.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For win32 programming, you''ll also use Structs alot. You also need to expand your horizons when it comes to data types, you''re not limited to just int, long, char, etc. any longer, now you have HWND, WNDCLASS, WPARAM, etc. I just wrote a tutorial on my webpage I just put up (which is still without a name ), you can read it and tell me what you think (via e-mail, so if it sucks, I''m not humiliated on this message board), the URL is http://atlas.spaceports.com/~bitblt/index_dev.html, it comes with example source and executable as well. It just covers creating a VERY basic window. I hope it helps if you check it out.



"We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of the dreams."
- Willy Wonka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
#include

int PASCAL WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance,
HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
LPSTR lpCmdLine,
int nShowCmd)
{
MessageBox(NULL,"This is a MessageBox","Caption",MB_OK);

return(0);
}

does it get any easier what is hard to understand? i see no chaos!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Absolutely. To tell you the truth, I actually learned DirectDraw (and directInput) before I even knew how to make a nice little window on the desktop. The first programs I compiled in windows were the demos from LaMothe''s books. I still haven''t done much with the kind of things you were talking about. Only now have I started to put my DirectX stuff in windows and use the buttons and whatnot. Anyways, I would say go for DirectX or OpenGL. I was surprised at how easy OpenGL was to learn (use NeHe''s tutorials). I have never read any openGL books, so I don''t know which ones are good, but if you want to learn DirectDraw / DirectInput / DirectSound, pick up Windows Game Programming for Dummies or Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus, both by LaMothe. They are both very good. The scary APIs aren''t so scary with after a little learning and experimentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!