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HeavyStorm

SVN and VC7.1

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Hell-o ppl, I'm having a certain amount of trouble using SVN together with Visual Studio, and I hope someone knows how to deal with it. The problem is that I've inserted into the repository all projects files the Studio creates, that is, the .sln, the .vcproj, the .ncb and the .suo. I believe the common pratice would be to insert only the first two, but the thing is that the .suo has a definition that is crucial to the project: it holds the "Working Directory" configuration entry. If I remove the file, I loose that entry in the config table. It's a real pain to reconfigure it every time that I have to make a new checkout, and even worse to explain to my colleages why this is the working path. I'm the project keeper. On the other hand, by keeping the .suo and .ncb files in the project, I'm making it even worse because those files are reserved by VC and I can't commit or update with the enviroment open. If someone understood the problem, is there a solution? Thanks in advance.

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The ncb is the intellesense database, that should be generated by VS everytime. The actual configuration information should reside in just the SLN and VCPROJ files (these are the only 2 VS files you need to include in the repository). Most of the other VS generated files are basically machine/user exclusive stuff that would change everytime if you actually had multiple users/computers working with the files.

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Original post by Rattrap
The ncb is the intellesense database, that should be generated by VS everytime. The actual configuration information should reside in just the SLN and VCPROJ files (these are the only 2 VS files you need to include in the repository). Most of the other VS generated files are basically machine/user exclusive stuff that would change everytime if you actually had multiple users/computers working with the files.


Yeah, I know... but, just take a simple test: insert a value in the "project settings"->"debugging"->"Working Directory", and then close vc and remove the .suo file. Open it again and the setting will have disappeared.

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You really shouldn't put the .suo file in version control. Apart from the fact that you can't commit while the environment is open (this is because VS holds a heavy lock on it), it is intended to be user specific (suo = Solution *User* Options). The working directory would usually vary for each user, depending on where he has the project checked out.

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Original post by Arild Fines
You really shouldn't put the .suo file in version control. Apart from the fact that you can't commit while the environment is open (this is because VS holds a heavy lock on it), it is intended to be user specific (suo = Solution *User* Options). The working directory would usually vary for each user, depending on where he has the project checked out.


Well, at least now I understand why they stored the information there. But heck, I needed it to be a pre-defined directory. The deal is that I have some dlls (and other resource files like databases and texts) that need to be on the same folder as the application. I don't want to change the code to make it reference the right folder, because on the release the files _will_ be on the same folder. Is there another way to tell VC to call the application from this folder, or at least to treat the folder local to the application's?

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Just because it isn't under source control, doesn't mean it wont exist. If you keep working on the same computer, the file is still going to be there and still current. The only time you would need to reset some of those settings is if you imported the repository to a seperate machine.

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Original post by Rattrap
Just because it isn't under source control, doesn't mean it wont exist. If you keep working on the same computer, the file is still going to be there and still current. The only time you would need to reset some of those settings is if you imported the repository to a seperate machine.


Yeah, the problem would be to my colleagues... they aren't, ahn, experts on Visual Studio (or any other IDE for that matter) and I'm afraid they would be killing themselves the day I'm not here to fix stuff up for them... But thanks a lot guys, at least I know why the conf. file is exclusive. I just wonder why MS hasn't kept it as a simple text file.

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