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Original sources of common Collision Detection methods?

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I was wondering who invented some of the common use Collision Detection method's often recommended here on gamedev.net For example space partitioning with grids to reduce O(n^2) collisions down to O(nk)? or using quad or octtrees to cull possible collisions between many objects? or sphere bounding voluemes around complicated shapes? Any that I missed? Lots of this is kinda commom knowlege on these forums, to the point that there is a loss of academic formality/credibility when it comes time to write about it; I'm doing a little background research on CD methods to compare with a new one I think I've invented and want to write about... So can anyone point me to the real sources? Thanks

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Well, the best way is to find books and papers about it, and look at their bibliographies. Then read those sources, and look at their bibliographies, rinse, repeat.

Or, contact an author or two and ask them.

Maybe a good place to start is here:

http://www.cs.unc.edu/~dm/collision.html

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What a coincidence!
I was looking through that very site earlier. My proff recommended them.
Tell me, is this purely a coincidence, or are these guys at UNC considered the 'bleeding edge' or 'authority' for collision detection research?

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UNC Chapel Hill has LONG been the bleeding edge of collision detection research...
There's a reason why Epic is located just next to Railey, NC. :)

Allan

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Quote:
Original post by __ODIN__
LONG been the bleeding edge


Hmmmh, so if my new algorithm idea doesn't show up in their papers(and it doesnt) Then either I have something new, or its actually quite bad and falls under their radar.

Any way to quantify 'bleeding edge' for the purposes of writing a paper? Perhaps theres a free database someplace that can tell me how many times they've been cited by other researchers in the field?

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CiteSeer is always a good bet for acad papers
http://www.researchindex.org/

If you've fully thought it out, and done your research to avoid the obvious mistakes, you COULD try talking to one of the profs there. I'd be a little humble, though; it's quite possible that what you have in mind already exists.

There are very few truely unqiue developments in research topics like this, where armies of desperate PhD students scurry around to carve out their 2"x2" of spot of 'unique research').

Best of luck,

Allan

[errata: minor language correction]

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