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Avont29

game programming career

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hello, im in the 10th grade. im looking into getting a career in game programming, i have some experience in it, and its what i want to do. i have some experience, and basic knowledge of C++ what is a game programmers salary? all i need is c++ knowledge and a bachelors degree in computer science correct? i was looking into going to westwood college, so i can get a degree in computer science right now my gpa is 2.9 , i've had some problems but it will come back up, it was 3.5 i live in the United States

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all i need is c++ knowledge and a bachelors degree in computer science correct?


Real life doesn't work like that. You can't just change classes because you meet some arbitrary stat requirements...

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Quote:
Original post by Avont29
i have some experience, and basic knowledge of C++

Hint: learn more languages and get proficient with at least one.
Quote:

what is a game programmers salary?

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all i need is c++ knowledge and a bachelors degree in computer science correct?

No. You'll need a passion for games, experience in at least one specialised field (preferably a good portfolio of finished game related projects) and good people skills/be a team player.
Just look at the requirements here.
Quote:

i live in the United States

Hm. That seemed pretty random. I don't live in the USA and still work in the industry.

The only advise I can give is - finish school, gather some experience by participating in projects like MODs or write and release freeware/shareware games or tools.
The former will help you learning how working in a team works (or how it fails), while the latter will give you more insight on the process of game creation.
Keep in mind that somtimes failure can be a greater learning experience than sustained success.

HTH,
Pat.

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Hey :). I don’t have too much experience when it comes to the game industry (Currently I am still on my first commercial game project heh), but anyway here is some advice:

1) Try hard in school and get really good at math (It helps!).

2) Try to expand your skills a bit more…. People these days aren’t just looking for c++ they also expect a programmer to be able to do web development also (At least I have had a few requests….)

3) You need to really love programming and making games… It is a ton of work and if you don’t love it then you need to get out right now. You should EXPECT long, late hours where you are on a tight deadline and you HAVE TO get results.

Oh and improve your c++ skills ;), having just a “basic” knowledge of c++ is not going to land you many projects O_o.

Lastly, you should really try to work on improving your English a bit….. It makes a better impression when you use capitalization and it helps people respect what you have to say. Write out a post in word if you have to!

Good luck!

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to increase your c++ skills i recomend you make the following games in order:
(Not a game but make these first)
Linked List
Doubly Linked List
Vector object

Pong (in Windows)
Asteroids (In API (OpenGL/DirectX) or choice)
Side Scrolling 2D Platform game (API of choice, even better if you use one different than the last)


After that, making a 3D game isnt just a next step. You will need a pretty strong grasp of vector math and a bit of understanding of matrix math.

I would work on programming systems after that. Organizing your code, for instance:

Instead of just calling that draw box function, you should have a data structure that defines a box, then you should have a object manager that maintains all the boxes in your world. The Box itself should be stand alone and able to render itself with a function call, but the manager should be in charge of all rendering.

Man, you got a long ways to go i imagine. I remeber when i was in 10th grade and i knew a little c++. Someone told me to make tetris and i didnt even have a clue where to start. Im finishing up my last year in colege now and there isnt anything i dont think i could code in c++. You know your ready to look for a job when doing something becomes a matter of knowing the concept behind it and not understanding the syntax.

Get one of those c++ books and go all the way up to Class's. Then move on to the STL (Standard Template Library) learn how those objects work and then create your own versions of them.

Then, move on to windows programming and make that pong game. Once you do that, you should be well versed enough to tackle an API realisticly (not just hack something together from random tutorials, like i did :P ) You will actually be able to undersand the concepts behind what your doing and things will make much more sense.

I dont know exactly how much you know, im just working off of the level i was at during that time :)

*edit* for a really good school on game programming, http://www.fullsail.com

It's a cram school, basically like highschool (same hours and attendance requirements) for 2 years, but you get a BA in game design when your done.

If you can make it there, you will know your shit. You go from cout << "Hello World" to creating an ascii based RPG with recrusive function ai pathing on a loaded ascii world in 3 months ... and that's the core core basics :D

By the time you hit final project, instead of writing a thesis you have 5 months to work with a team on a game project. You and your friends have to work together and take lead positions (Project Manager, Tech. Lead, Design Lead etc.. ) and make a 3D game. I just started final project, so four months before im out and i know of people on their second year in a normal college for a CS degree just getting into the basics of coding :P

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When I e-mailed John Carmack for my econ project I asked him kind of the same thing:

ME: What would you recommend telling someone looking to get there foot in the gamming industry?

JC: Modifying a commercial game to demonstrate your skill at working with a large codebase is usually the most useful demonstration, but also having smaller project developed completely from scratch shows bredth of skill.

I.E. Modifying the Quake 3 engine and making a stand alone game with it(something simple). And making a stand alone simple graphics engine with test demo built on top of it. Because you need to have a demo when you try to look for a job that actuaratlly depicts your skills.

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Quote:
Original post by nef
to increase your c++ skills i recomend you make the following games in order:
(Not a game but make these first)
Linked List
Doubly Linked List
Vector object

Pong (in Windows)
Asteroids (In API (OpenGL/DirectX) or choice)
Side Scrolling 2D Platform game (API of choice, even better if you use one different than the last)


After that, making a 3D game isnt just a next step. You will need a pretty strong grasp of vector math and a bit of understanding of matrix math.

I would work on programming systems after that. Organizing your code, for instance:

Instead of just calling that draw box function, you should have a data structure that defines a box, then you should have a object manager that maintains all the boxes in your world. The Box itself should be stand alone and able to render itself with a function call, but the manager should be in charge of all rendering.

Man, you got a long ways to go i imagine. I remeber when i was in 10th grade and i knew a little c++. Someone told me to make tetris and i didnt even have a clue where to start. Im finishing up my last year in colege now and there isnt anything i dont think i could code in c++. You know your ready to look for a job when doing something becomes a matter of knowing the concept behind it and not understanding the syntax.

Get one of those c++ books and go all the way up to Class's. Then move on to the STL (Standard Template Library) learn how those objects work and then create your own versions of them.

Then, move on to windows programming and make that pong game. Once you do that, you should be well versed enough to tackle an API realisticly (not just hack something together from random tutorials, like i did :P ) You will actually be able to undersand the concepts behind what your doing and things will make much more sense.

I dont know exactly how much you know, im just working off of the level i was at during that time :)

*edit* for a really good school on game programming, http://www.fullsail.com

It's a cram school, basically like highschool (same hours and attendance requirements) for 2 years, but you get a BA in game design when your done.

If you can make it there, you will know your shit. You go from cout << "Hello World" to creating an ascii based RPG with recrusive function ai pathing on a loaded ascii world in 3 months ... and that's the core core basics :D

By the time you hit final project, instead of writing a thesis you have 5 months to work with a team on a game project. You and your friends have to work together and take lead positions (Project Manager, Tech. Lead, Design Lead etc.. ) and make a 3D game. I just started final project, so four months before im out and i know of people on their second year in a normal college for a CS degree just getting into the basics of coding :P


UCF rules.


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You will need to know more than just C++. You will probable need to know some libraries and other stuff like trig, linear a;gebra (i'm guessing you already know some of this), possibly calculus, physics, etc.

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The first piece of advice I would give is work out why you want to do it.

Think of the rewards it gives you, the things about it that actually have meaning to you. And why they have meaning to you.

Because when you start getting into the thick of it, what's cool and what's fun doesn't count for much. What has meaning to you does. What makes you feel good about yourself, and makes you feel like you've grown, does.



The gaming industry can be a real dog eat dog world.
If you don't know what you're going for, you will always be fighting the next obstacle, instead of driven by a motivation that is focussed and excited. And a dog eat dog world is not a world where you want to be doing it the fighting way.

For example, you say you want a career in game programming. All that says is about you is that somewhere a game is made, and you want to be one of the little people behind it.
Do you just want to design the gameplay? Because you didn't say that bit.
Do you just want to debug the thing?
Do you want to create the atmosphere and feel of a game? Or is that not it either?

Which bit pulls you in.. and why?
Do you want to be able to create worlds?
Express emotions?
Flex a talent of creativity you just can't find an outlet for?
Which is it? It can't be the money.
Or the hours.
Or the social scene.
Or the travel.

So in a team that builds interactive entertainment software, what part actually drives you? Possibly none of it.

If there's ever an industry in which to confuse safety with personal drive, its this one.


Before you pick your path, know the emotional destination. Know the reward you feel. If you don't, it will just be an uninspired, therefore unmotivated, therefore unsuccessful journey.


That's my advice.

(Sorry its a bit sharp.)

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