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Windows and graphics clerification

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Ok, i need some serious explaining here. First of all, i understand that in order to create a game in full screen on top of windows, we have to use DX or OGL etc to override the windows graphic system, GDI, etc. Ok, now, here is the question, what is it DX, and or windows uses to access high resolution modes? In dos, we access its interrupts. Ok, fine, but those interrupt functions set the video to the proper resolution. right? Ok, so if i created my own OS, what is it i would need to do to access those high res modes, or wrather what is the interrupt doing to change the screen mode??? Also, what is it that OGL for instance does to access those modes under windows? If DX is microsofts API, and OGL was made by SGI, did microsoft give SGI the specs on how to access the screen via windows? I''m so confused on these matters, please somebody help me.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
DX and GL don''t talk to the hardware, they talk to the video card''s drivers, which then talk to the hardware. So if you make your own O/S you are going to need video card drivers, and the manufacturers might not let you in on how to do that.

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Fullscreen OpenGL in Windows is usually just implemented as a big window that sits on top of everything else. Changing resolutions is done (as far as I know) by calling WinAPI routines to actually change your Windows resolution for the lifetime of your program.

I''m not 100% sure about DirectX but I think the Anonymous Poster is correct in that it talks to the graphics hardware via the drivers, and effectively has direct access to the screen.

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