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kevtimc

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kevtimc    230
Budding game programmer here, I'm learning the basic C++ cmd basics from various resources. I was wondering, what should I learn after the basics if I want to head for game dev/programming? All feedback appreciated.

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Torrente    229
Learn to use either Opengl or DirectX with C++. You might might want to consider learning C# as well, seeing as how c# is a much cleaner and easier to use language and will probably become more popular in game development in a few years.

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Torrente    229
Well, perhaps not. Try using GDI+ to do some graphical applications and get used to classes and the like. Then, if you are still wary of DirectX or OpenGL, you can use another engine, such as Truevision3d, which is very impressive.

www.truevision3d.com

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Azh321    569
Googling it or looking it up on Wikipedia would have told you:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GDI_Plus

Good luck

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Telastyn    3777
Quote:
Original post by kevtimc
thnx, should I do that RIGHT after the basics?


The slightly more than basics, obviously...

But in all seriousness, you're only going to hinder your progress if you try to go too fast, or poke at APIs before you're ready.

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kevtimc    230
Quote:
Original post by Telastyn
Quote:
Original post by kevtimc
thnx, should I do that RIGHT after the basics?


The slightly more than basics, obviously...

But in all seriousness, you're only going to hinder your progress if you try to go too fast, or poke at APIs before you're ready.


So whats your opinion, what do you think I should do after finishing my "basics" book?

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Ezbez    1164
I like SDL for simple 2D applications. Its straight forward to use, free, and powerful(if not blazzingly fast). It does 2D graphics, sound, image loading, user input from keyboards and mice(gamepads/joysticks too), and even networking. Check it out here.

And learning more of the language will *always* benefit you. To help us help you, what does your book get up? Does it get into Polymorphism and inheritance? You could also look into a book about proper design of code. Code Complete version 2 is a good book on the topic. Look in the For Beginner's section of Gamedev for more info on it and some other books.

If your book doesn't cover the Standard Library, you'll want to look into its features. The ones that come to mind as most useful include std::list, std::vector, and std::string. Google 'em for tutorials and descriptions.

Good luck and have fun!

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Ezbez
I like SDL for simple 2D applications. Its straight forward to use, free, and powerful(if not blazzingly fast). It does 2D graphics, sound, image loading, user input from keyboards and mice(gamepads/joysticks too), and even networking. Check it out here.

And learning more of the language will *always* benefit you. To help us help you, what does your book get up? Does it get into Polymorphism and inheritance? You could also look into a book about proper design of code. Code Complete version 2 is a good book on the topic. Look in the For Beginner's section of Gamedev for more info on it and some other books.

If your book doesn't cover the Standard Library, you'll want to look into its features. The ones that come to mind as most useful include std::list, std::vector, and std::string. Google 'em for tutorials and descriptions.

Good luck and have fun!


It goes up to some basic IDE, C++ builder looks like

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Ezbez
I like SDL for simple 2D applications. Its straight forward to use, free, and powerful(if not blazzingly fast). It does 2D graphics, sound, image loading, user input from keyboards and mice(gamepads/joysticks too), and even networking. Check it out here.

And learning more of the language will *always* benefit you. To help us help you, what does your book get up? Does it get into Polymorphism and inheritance? You could also look into a book about proper design of code. Code Complete version 2 is a good book on the topic. Look in the For Beginner's section of Gamedev for more info on it and some other books.

If your book doesn't cover the Standard Library, you'll want to look into its features. The ones that come to mind as most useful include std::list, std::vector, and std::string. Google 'em for tutorials and descriptions.

Good luck and have fun!


It goes up to some basic IDE, C++ builder looks like


btw it does cover vectors and strings ( ) havent seen list yet though

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SKATIN_HARD    175
SDL is a great library to try and use with c++. It would probably be easier to learn before OpenGL or DirectX. It isn't very hard to setup and the code examples are easy to read. You could program some small 2D game or app and then move on to the 3D stuff after that.

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kevtimc    230
Then I guess ill check out SDL, thanks for all your help, I have some motivation to move on now. Also looks like ive found a place to stay and chat with other game developers :).

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BTownTKD    205
I must point out that "basics" is highly relevant. There are a couple topics that could really help you, and are in a sort of 'grey' area between "basic basics" and "advanced basics" (for lack of better terms, lol).

Make sure you have a solid grasp of:
-Classes
-Inheritance/Polymorphism
-Data structures (more important than you might initially think)

From there, I'd definitely recommend moving on to SDL... it's a great starting place for graduating from the basics. I'm working my way through it right now (and am happy to announce that I can now display a smiley face and move it around with the keyboard! Next step... animating the face!)

Best of luck to ya!

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anonuser    148
I'm going to be a bit different here.

I'd say learn C. Get a very solid grasp of C because C is a simple language and very basic. C++ is a very complex language and I'd feel bad if someone learns the language as C with classes when there's so much more to it. And all of C++ is hard to take in all at once.

After you're done with C I'd take what you know about procedural programming and keep it close to heart but then forget everything. Learn threaded design and programming. It'll be more useful than you know.

After you have your threaded fun done. Then go for an advanced language cause then you'll begin to appreciate the abstractions and the wonderufl things you can do to automate a lot of things. To me it cleans up a lot of things.

Wanting to head to game programming is a dangerous thing. It's not easy. Writing a game takes a lot of skill and effort. Especially if you want to do ground breaking work. The problem lies in the fact a game must be an entire system. You have a lot more to deal with than most programs. I mean most business applications I write are simple. You have data, process data, spit result. A game well is a game! There's so much too it!

I'd start off writing simple programs to test your skills. Then maybe fun little things like a sprite animator. Work your way to it. Don't dive in, you'll drown.

Good luck!

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